The BASIS.ed
Senior Projects 2017

The Senior Project at BASIS Scottsdale is a selective program that involves an off-campus research project or internship of the students’ choice and design. Students select a BASIS.ed faculty member as their advisor and work with a mentor at their selected research site. These projects may be completed anywhere in the world. At the end of the trimester, students return to campus and present an analysis of their findings to peers, staff, and parents.

BASIS Scottsdale is one of 10 BASIS Curriculum Schools participating in the 2017 BASIS.ed Senior Project Program. To view the details of a specific project, select a student below.

See all BASIS Senior Projects

Adam W

Adam W.

cYbeR You Not Secure? How to Be Safe in an Online World

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Adam W

Adam W.

cYbeR You Not Secure? How to Be Safe in an Online World

BASIS advisor: Mr. TJ Peacher
Internship location: Office of Mark Vange
Onsite Mentor: Mr. Mark Vange, Serial Technological Entreprenuer
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Technology has become one of the biggest sectors of the economy. With all technology, there is the looming threat of cyber-criminals who will steal important private information. This topic is not only vital to address for big businesses that accumulate large sums of money and government bodies that own vast amounts of classified information, but also for the individual. My research attempts to guide the average person to a more secure experience online through the compiling of methods and rules to follow when navigating the cyber world. A survey will be administered that will ask about participants’ general online habits. A specific set of rules will be distributed to all participants that will outline proper precautions for internet usage based upon their survey answers. I will also include information about the many ways cyber-criminals can gain access to private information. Knowing the enemy is half the battle, so understanding how cyber-criminals attack is always going to be useful knowledge. This research tries to enhance the lives of online users by creating rules to follow and teaching online safety.

Akash S

Akash S.

Finding Value in Snapchat: A Comparable FIrms Approach to Social Media IPOs

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Akash S

Akash S.

Finding Value in Snapchat: A Comparable FIrms Approach to Social Media IPOs

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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Snapchat, an app which allows users to share pictures and videos, is growing at an unprecedented rate, quickly gaining financial power in the already-immense social media industry. According to E-Marketer, in 2016 alone, the app’s value increased nearly 23 percent and is projected to grow another 13.6 percent in 2017, greater than all other major media firms. As such, Snapchat has announced that it will conduct an Initial Public Offering (IPO), a financial event where a company first begins trading on the stockmarket. Financial analysts, however, have a difficult time predicting the price of stocks post-IPO because of various market forces. Social media, an industry whose assets are primarily that of research and development, is especially difficult to value. Therefore, the current study aims to value Snapchat through past social media IPOs. By using a comparable firms approach designed to value companies similar to Snapchat, the study analyzed the firms Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, LinkedIn, and Tencent Holdings Inc. to determine the efficacy of different valuation techniques known as comparable firm multiples. Based on past research, this study used five comparable firm multiples which were deemed most accurate and appropriate for evaluating the social media industry. By using the multiples to project IPO price and calculate pricing errors for each of the five firms, this research will determine the most effective multiple. Thus, the study provides a technique that individual and institutional investors can apply to determine whether to invest in Snapchat and other social media firms.

Amaan M

Amaan M.

Europa: The Potential for Life on Jupiter's Icy Moon

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Amaan M

Amaan M.

Europa: The Potential for Life on Jupiter's Icy Moon

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
Internship location: University of Arizona (online)
Onsite Mentor: Shane Byrne, Professor
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In 1971, NASA’s Voyager II mission successfully completed its analysis of Jupiter’s moons. The mission collected raw data and thousands of images that allowed researchers to discover more about the planet’s moons. One of these moons, Europa, drew tremendous interest from the scientific community, as all evidence showed that the moon had a liquid ocean right beneath its frigid, icy shell exterior. The presence of liquid water, a carbon-dioxide atmosphere, and biotic deposits from asteroid impacts prompted new discussion of the possibility of life on the moon, with NASA saying that Europa was the most likely planetary body to contain life in our solar system. Given the high scientific interest in potential life on Europa, NASA has revealed plans for the Clipper mission, a rover set to explore Europa’s surface. Before sending Clipper, research must be done to determine the most likely regions on Europa’s surface that could support life. Thus, the focus of this research is to determine regions near the proposed landing site that hold the most promising combination of signs of life through imaging data that convey temperature, which indicates the presence of liquid water; altitudes, which demonstrate the stability of the atmosphere; and precise coordinate locations of craters, which illustrate the biotic deposits from asteroid impacts. By determining these locations, the Clipper mission– set to launch in 2022– will be more successful in its mission for discovering signs of past or present life in our solar system.

Ameya K

Ameya K.

Following Up or Follow Through: Physical Therapy and Patient Compliance

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Ameya K

Ameya K.

Following Up or Follow Through: Physical Therapy and Patient Compliance

BASIS advisor: Ms. Bakhshish Kaur
Internship location: Synergy PT
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Vincent Peries, Clinical Director
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After every physical therapy session, the therapist provides the patient with a series of home exercises to complete before the next appointment. Ultimately, it is up to the patient to decide whether or not to follow through. Research conducted during the past few decades has highlighted an alarming degree of patient non-compliance. According to a study by the National Institute of Health in 2005, as many as 40% of physical therapy patients fail to comply with treatment plans. Additionally, when these plans require lifestyle changes or are very complex, non-compliance can be as high as 70%. This project aims to analyze the long term implications of adherence v. non-adherence on the patient’s recovery. Now, how exactly are we to measure patient compliance? Self-reported surveys or charts? Not every patient will be so willing to admit he/she has not completed their recommended exercise routine. Therefore, this project goes beyond the basic questionnaire that will be administered. While observing physical therapy sessions, I will record and analyze patients’ muscle tension after being manually stretched out by a physical therapist. This will help determine the degree to which the patient performed the home exercises. Through my research, I hope to determine how accurately patients tend to report compliance and help eliminate possible treatment barriers.

Anirudh R

Anirudh R.

Time to Hit the Gym! Fitness, Stress, and the Immune System

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Anirudh R

Anirudh R.

Time to Hit the Gym! Fitness, Stress, and the Immune System

BASIS advisor: Ms. Brittany Afsa
Internship location: Underground Fitness
Onsite Mentor: Mr. Matt Hoodi, Owner, Operator
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Have you ever attempted to get fit and lead a more healthy and active lifestyle? Have you tried working out, but quit because it was too difficult, you did not have the time, or you simply could not stick to your diet plan? The President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition states that only one in three adults receive the recommended weekly amount of physical exercise. There are many reasons why people do not exercise regularly, which may also be linked to increases in stress. According to a report by the Global Organization for Stress in 2011, stress levels are rising in the workplace, with six out of ten workers reporting significant increases. Focusing on the psychology of fitness in my project, I seek to determine if a correlation exists between increased physical activity and decreased stress levels. By collecting data though a series of surveys given to clients at Underground Fitness, a center for personal training, I will examine whether fitness and dieting can lead to a healthier lifestyle over time. If there is a correlation between physical exercise and decreased stress levels, I intend to share the results with friends, family, potential fitness trainers or doctors, giving the general populace a way to deal with everyday stress.

Anjalee J

Anjalee J.

Family Exome Sequencing

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Anjalee J

Anjalee J.

Family Exome Sequencing

BASIS advisor: Mr. Asher Molk
Internship location: Tgen's Center for Rare Childhood Disorders
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Vinodh Narayanan, Medical Director
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According to the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Rare Disease Research, around 30 million people have a rare disorder (defined as one that affects less than 200,000 people) in the U.S. alone. Around 80% of these rare diseases are caused by a genetic mutation, and 50% of the affected population are children. The Center for Rare Childhood Disorders is a non-profit clinic associated with the Translational Genomics Institute (TGen) which uses genomic sequencing as a diagnostic tool. Exome sequencing entails looking at a person’s complete set of genetic material. The goal of exome sequencing is to create a more tailored and personalized treatment plan for individuals suffering though rare diseases. By researching exome sequencing through the scope of one patient, I hope to identify when this treatment is most effective, its benefits, and shortcomings. This research will not only hopefully diagnose this patient, but add information to scientific databases to benefit any other patient with the same symptoms.

Anthony B

Anthony B.

Creating a Brighter Future with Radiotherapy

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Anthony B

Anthony B.

Creating a Brighter Future with Radiotherapy

BASIS advisor: Mr. Paul McClernon
Internship location: Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Anshuman Panda, Assistant Professor
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Prostate cancer is one of the deadliest diseases in the world, and after skin cancer, it is the most common cancer among men. To detect prostate cancer, radiologists rely chiefly on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans in order to determine the presence of cancer, its progression, and the threat it poses to the patient. With the data from these MRI scans, radiologists are able to devise individualized treatment plans for each patient, ensuring the best possible care. On the cutting edge of radiotherapy and cancer treatment, Mayo Clinic has recently installed a cyclotron for producing radioactive nucleotides (PET tracers) in addition to a PET/MRI machine capable of acquiring nuclear medicine and MRI data in a single exam. This development will greatly benefit radiologists by providing improved data sets and greater options for all cancer patients. Recently, the radiology department at Mayo Clinic has began an initiative to streamline the diagnostic and treatment process of cancer, with a focus on prostate cancer. This research involves classifying the prostate cancer MR images into two groups: screening and staging, and then analyzing it. While screening exams determine the presence of cancer, staging exams take a deeper look into the severity and progression of the cancer in order to develop a treatment plan. With the application of machine learning, image analysis, and the compilation of patient data, this research aims to create a faster, more efficient, and more effective infrastructure for radiologists to diagnose and treat prostate cancer.

Ashwath V

Ashwath V.

From Gene to Protein: Unlocking the Relationship between Mutations and Protein Folding in the LacI Repressor

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Ashwath V

Ashwath V.

From Gene to Protein: Unlocking the Relationship between Mutations and Protein Folding in the LacI Repressor

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
Internship location: ASU
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Ozkan , Professor
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Proteins are one of four macromolecules essential to life. They catalyze reactions, transport molecules, and defend the body. Protein-folding determines the shape and function of these essential macromolecules. Errors in protein folding have been linked to degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. If the errors can be understood and reversed, these debilitating diseases may be solved. However, scientists have struggled to properly model proteins. While it is understood, through computational analysis, that proteins are in constant dynamic motion, the precise means by which proteins fold are unknown. Specifically, questions surround conserved and nonconserved positions in proteins, or positions that were thought to be essential and nonessential to protein function, respectively. Professor Swint-Kruse, however, determined that nonconserved positions still affect the overall function of the protein, even without affecting the structure. To better understand why nonconserved positions affect the function of a protein, this study employed a computational analysis, REMD, of two Lac1 protein samples to identify the dynamics of nonconserved positions within proteins. The first sample was unaltered, while the second sample had a drastically changed nonconserved region to see how changes in position alter protein dynamics. Specifically, DFI (dynamic flexibility index) was used to reveal how protein structure affects function. Comparing the differences in dynamics between the two Lac1 samples will provide insight into the underlying protein-folding mechanisms that have confused scientists for decades. The ultimate goal of this information is to facilitate the curing of the aforementioned degenerative diseases.

Audrey E

Audrey E.

The Natural Choice: An Exploration of Consumer Responses to Natural and Unnatural Makeup

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Audrey E

Audrey E.

The Natural Choice: An Exploration of Consumer Responses to Natural and Unnatural Makeup

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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The market for natural makeup has been substantially increasing, primarily because many consumers believe that natural makeup is healthier and higher quality than unnatural makeup. However, perceived health hazards of unnatural makeup have been debunked, and, while there is no evidence disproving the perceived superior quality of natural makeup, the manipulability of chemical ingredients suggests that unnatural makeup would be superior. Therefore, the question arises as to whether consumers choose natural makeup because it is actually superior in quality or because of the aforementioned societal influences. Participants took a blind consumption test involving four popular brands of lip gloss — natural brands bareMinerals and Burt’s Bees. as well as unnatural brands MAC and L’oreal — to discern their sensory preferences. Thereafter, participants completed an exit survey which identified their perceived brand preferences and measured how strongly they affiliate with the natural product movement. If participants’ blind consumption choices align with their self-identified brand preferences, then consumer choice is based on actual sensed quality differences between the products. However, if participants’ choices differ, then their decision making is based on emotional perceptions derived from societal influences, corroborating current research. Moreover, the exit survey was used to discern if the emotional choices could be traced to the natural product movement. The results will provide insight into consumer decision-making, which could inform individual consumers and contribute to market research on purchasing patterns in the cosmetics industry.

Brent A

Brent A.

Seeing Eye to i: Using the iStent to Combat Glaucoma

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Brent A

Brent A.

Seeing Eye to i: Using the iStent to Combat Glaucoma

BASIS advisor: Mr. Ryan Carey
Internship location: Swagel-Wootton-Hiatt Eye Center
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Yuri McKee, Ophthalmic Surgeon
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Glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world, affects nearly 4% of the human population today (World Health Organization, 2014). The condition results from damage to the optic nerve. A controllable risk factor that can lead to damage to the nerve is high intraocular pressure (IOP). A potential solution to this problem is the iStent, a small stent that is designed to relieve pressure in the eye. Another procedure being analyzed and compared to the iStent is the Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT), a laser surgery that modestly decreases IOP. This study is a retrospective cohort study of 270 SLT-only eyes, 85 iStent-only eyes, and 16 eyes with both surgeries performed in the 5-month period. The Preoperative IOP through 24-Month IOP is then analyzed for each eye. After analysis of the data, the iStent-alone decreased the pressure, on average, by 2.5 mmHg (p=6.07×10^-5). The SLT decreased the pressure by 0.6 mmHg (p=0.03713989). Those who received both surgeries showed a decrease in pressure by 2.05 mmHg (p=0.01502573). These results show the effectiveness of the iStent in decreasing IOP. Thus, I expect to find that the iStent is a dependable solution to Glaucoma caused by high IOP in a 24-month period.

Brian Z

Brian Z.

What's So Great about Them? An Ethnographic Analysis of High-Achieving Charter Schools

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Brian Z

Brian Z.

What's So Great about Them? An Ethnographic Analysis of High-Achieving Charter Schools

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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Public schools have struggled for decades to adequately educate their students. Despite the passage of legislation to increase student proficiencies, most states only have a reading proficiency between 20-30%. In response to shortcomings of the public education system, during the 1990s, many states passed legislation creating charter schools as a means of experimenting with teaching methods to improve student education. In order to facilitate the experimentation of new pedagogy, charter schools were given greater autonomy than public schools; however, said autonomy has resulted in large variation among the quality of charter schools. While some charter schools are significantly outperforming their local public schools, others fall short of the standards established by the state. In fact, little is known about what techniques culminate in a high-achieving charter school. However, the entire purpose of charter schools was to test new educational practices to identify the techniques that facilitate improved student learning. Thus, this research aims to determine what school-controlled characteristics determine the success of a charter school so that charter schools can fulfill their creationary purpose of identifying the most effective teaching methods. By using a high achieving charter school as a case study, an ethnography comprised of surveys, interviews, and classroom observations provided a comprehensive understanding of the school atmosphere and operations. By identifying the qualities that result in high achievement, this will allow other charter schools to examine their school model and determine what improvements can be made to foster greater achievement among their students.

Brian G

Brian G.

When to Water: A Plan Physiological Approach

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Brian G

Brian G.

When to Water: A Plan Physiological Approach

BASIS advisor: Ms. Lydia Reznik
Internship location: Desert Botanical Garden
Onsite Mentor: Mr. Dan Koepke, Research Technician
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The Fremont cottonwood (Populus Fremontii) is a keystone species, but the number of Fremont cottonwoods is decreasing rapidly primarily due to the grazing of domestic cattle. Planting Fremont cottonwoods is an important part of projects to restore riparian environments in the American southwest. Dozens of Fremont cottonwoods with different physiological properties were grown in gardens across the state of Arizona at various elevation and latitudes. Over the course of two years, leaves were collected from the Fremont cottonwoods in the common gardens. These leaves were dried, ground, and tested with mass spectroscopy to determine their carbon-12 to carbon-13 ratios. The carbon-12 to carbon-13 ratio of the leaves of a tree is a robust indicator of that tree’s water-status, how dehydrated that tree is. This is true because trees intake carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but they prefer to use carbon-13. Photosynthesis also requires water. When trees are willing to expend water to perform photosynthesis with carbon-12, it means that water is abundant, and when trees are not willing, it means that water is scarce. Considering the carbon-12 to carbon-13 ratio of these trees and climatic data over the course of two years will provide a detailed picture of which physiological traits are most advantageous in different climates. This information will make environmental restorations more effective, which will help alleviate the ecological and economic harms of raising cattle like larger wildfires and the endangerment of native species.

Carla R

Carla R.

Let's Get Physical: Specialization of Physical Therapy

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Carla R

Carla R.

Let's Get Physical: Specialization of Physical Therapy

BASIS advisor: Ms. Erika Stender
Internship location: CAP Physical Therapy
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Ryan Jeschien, DPT
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In the 21st century, physical therapy has been in increasing demand, especially for sports-related injuries, arthritic pain, and post-operative recovery. Physical therapy entails more constant doctor-patient interaction, a type of relationship which generates a necessary specialization for each individual patient’s rehabilitation. By incorporating both the therapist and patients’ opinions and ideas into the therapy process, regimens differ per patient depending on their ability, comfort, and pain levels. In order to look further into the specialization of knee and hip injuries (specifically Iliotibial Band Syndrome, Anterior Cruciate Ligament repairs, and total hip replacements), the methodology applied in this research will be primarily observational – reading charts which describe the exercises needed, watching therapists guide patients or alter their programs, etc. Based on the factors which influence the individualized formulation of therapies, a distinct universality for the therapist-patient relationship in regards will be realized. As the physical therapy field benefits a wide range of patients, the specialization and individuation of knee and hip therapies allowed must be considered in the context of each patient’s long-term benefit and recovery time. It is likely that increased regimen specification based on injury type, age, and physical ability combined with a deeper patient understanding of the therapists’ reasoning will result in a more long lasting and time efficient physical therapy practice.

Catherine O

Catherine O.

Surviving Modern Reality Television: A Content Analysis of the Hit Reality TV Show Survivor

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Catherine O

Catherine O.

Surviving Modern Reality Television: A Content Analysis of the Hit Reality TV Show Survivor

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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Survivor, a competition reality show, is the longest-lasting series in reality television, the fastest growing television genre. Reality television serves as the main form of entertainment for many Americans. Furthermore, according to Dorothy Hopson, professor in television studies, the television Americans choose emulates their social and economic being. In other words, the ways that people choose to gratify themselves reflects their consumption priorities. Thus, reality television provides poignant insight into American consumption culture; however, reality television is the least theorized genre. Since Survivor is uniquely long-lasting, examining how the competition reality show has continually appealed to consumers can reveal American values. Current research suggests that media in general has become more repetitious, as individuals are drawn to the familiar. Therefore, this research aims to determine if Survivor has become more formulaic over its 16-year run to continually gratify traditional American television viewing audiences. A content analysis analyzed Survivor’s format through tabulations of time dedicated to different elements of the show. The tabulations were rendered into percentages, which conveyed the time dedicated to a certain element within the overall time of the show. Those percentages were then compared by creating trend lines across seasons to determine if there were any patterns in Survivor’s composition. By determining if Survivor has become more formulaic, this research will not only obtain valuable insight into how the entertainment industry in general is shifting to continually appeal to consumers, but also how American consumption culture is evolving.

Danielle B

Danielle B.

The Time to ACT is Now: An Analysis of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

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Danielle B

Danielle B.

The Time to ACT is Now: An Analysis of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

BASIS advisor: Mr. Troy Campbell
Internship location: Mayo Clinic
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Yonas Geda, Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry
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In the United States alone, 19 million people suffer from depression, 100 million from chronic pain, and 40 million adults from anxiety (World Health Organization, 2012). In a country of roughly 320 million people, the effects extend beyond the millions of people struggling with mental disorders to also impact their families and friends. Finding an effective treatment or therapy plan is critical to improving the quality of life for these individuals. One approach that has shown varying levels of success is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). To better understand is effectiveness, I will write a systematic review on the neurobiological underpinnings of ACT. I will compile papers relating to the psychological underpinnings of ACT, the physiological aspects of ACT, and changes in patients’ neural pathways. The paper will explain how neural pathways may be altered through ACT, leading to a life with less pain and distress. I expect to find that ACT has roots in peaceful teachings and that it fosters physiological neural change.

Daphne L

Daphne L.

Hoping and Coping: The Homeless Population's Experience with Religious Coping

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Daphne L

Daphne L.

Hoping and Coping: The Homeless Population's Experience with Religious Coping

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
Internship location: Crossroads
Onsite Mentor: R'Shee Holly, Shelter Coordinator
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In the United States, the number of homeless individuals remains within the hundreds of thousands. This statistic is staggering given the inherent instability of the homeless population, as well as the prevalence of additional stressors, such as substance abuse and mental illness. Homeless individuals are especially in need of coping mechanisms to deal with the disproportionate prevalence of these factors. Due to this population’s lack of resources, religious coping presents itself as the most accessible and effective coping mechanism. However, not all religious coping is beneficial. Religious coping can be broken up into negative and positive religious coping, where the type of coping is directly correlated with the individual’s perspective on God. Therefore, in order to determine what type of coping a person will use, it is imperative to understand how their views on God were created. Thus, this research sought to understand first what coping mechanisms homeless individuals used, and then to connect those mechanisms with past life experiences. A phenomenological study, an interview-based exploration into people’s perceptions and experiences, was employed by conducting interviews with individuals currently residing in homeless shelters. An analysis of the transcripts categorized coping as positive or negative and extracted the major themes from individual experiences. The two types of coping were then correlated with their respective themes to determine if there were any trends in how past experiences inform present coping. Understanding how religious coping mechanisms form is instrumental in aiding professionals to best help the homeless population cope.

Divya V

Divya V.

Automated Prediction Model for Chemotherapy Treatment Regimens through Molecular and Genomic Feature Selection

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Divya V

Divya V.

Automated Prediction Model for Chemotherapy Treatment Regimens through Molecular and Genomic Feature Selection

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
Internship location: Harvard University (online)
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Gil Alterovitz, Professor
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Cancer is a leading cause of death around the world. However, chemotherapy, one of the most common cancer treatments, has significant efficacy issues arising from the uncertainty of what the most effective chemotherapy regimens, or combinations of chemotherapeutic drugs, are for individual patients. Physically testing regimen efficacy through clinical trials is lengthy and impractical; however, computational techniques, the use of statistical models that can quickly identify trends in large inputs of data, overcome the limitations of physical testing. Thus, the objective of this study is to create a computational model to determine the most effective regimens for breast cancer patients by analyzing the molecular and genomic mechanisms responsible for regimen efficacy. This study implemented an outcomes analysis, molecular analysis, and genomic analysis. The outcomes analysis used meta-analysis statistics to rank a set of tested breast cancer regimens from most to least effective based on outcomes data from clinical trials. From the effective regimens in the outcomes analysis, the molecular analysis identified untested regimens with similar molecular features. Finally, the genomic analysis predicted whether the untested regimens identified in the molecular analysis would actually be effective against various breast cancer mutations. The model will allow the medical community to identify regimens that will likely be most effective for individual breast cancer patients by understanding molecular and genomic mechanisms responsible for regimen efficacy. Thus, this research transforms chemotherapy from a general to targeted treatment model, improving likelihood of treatment success and the lives of cancer patients around the world.

Eric Y

Eric Y.

Poof: Optimizing Antenna Inflation Times

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Eric Y

Eric Y.

Poof: Optimizing Antenna Inflation Times

BASIS advisor: Mr. Paul McClernon
Internship location: ASU, SpaceTREx Lab
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Jekan Thangavelautham, Assistant Professor, Head of SpaceTREx Laboratory
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University research into space is often expensive. Academia has taken steps to make university research into space more affordable and scalable. An example of this is the development of the CubeSat initiative, which is a specification for satellites that have a size that is a multiple of 10×10×11.35 cm cubic units, fulfilling all of its mission purposes with its small form factor. With smaller and cheaper satellites, one important question to ask is: how can we communicate with these satellites and still maintain the compact form factor? The answer lies in inflatable antenna. Inflatable antenna must be able to conform to the satellite dimensions when deployed and still inflate to a size and shape that will yield adequate signal gain. By the tenets of antenna dishes, the larger the size, the better the signal gain. However, while the size of a deployed antenna is important, the shape of the dish must come as close as possible to parabolic in order to focus the greatest percentage of gathered signal. In my project, I will create an apparatus that can measure an inflatable’s deviation from its ideal parabolic shape, and subsequently test the antennae with novel apparatus.

Frida G

Frida G.

Beyond the Verdict: The Victim's Role in the Criminal Justice System

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Frida G

Frida G.

Beyond the Verdict: The Victim's Role in the Criminal Justice System

BASIS advisor: Mr. Adam Atkinson
Internship location: Arizona Department of Corrections Victim Services
Onsite Mentor: Ms. Jaquel Moody, Supervisor, Victim Advocate
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Every day on the news, it seems there is a story about crime: a robbery at gunpoint, a missing child, a violent sexual assault. When we see these stories, we often feel concerned for a moment and then continue on with our day. Unfortunately for many, the concern does not end with a five minute news segment. Although victims’ lives are forever changed as they attempt to recover from horrific events, the public only sees a slight glimpse of their lives and tends to quickly forget their stories. The needs of the victim are not always adequately fulfilled through the criminal justice system. Fortunately, Arizona Victim Services provides support for the victim post-conviction. However, depending on the case, this is sometimes not enough. For instance, once the defendant is released from prison, the victim does not have access to information like his or her whereabouts. Victims are only allowed to know the general area where their perpetrator(s) lives. Although they can obtain orders of protection against these individuals, this may not be enough. Can it really prevent someone from becoming a victim once again? This project aims to show the types of reform and advocacy that are necessary to enhance the amount of support and representation available to victims of serious crimes. Using the observations I make during my experience at Victim Services, I will identify important steps for victims to receive fair treatment and representation within the criminal justice system.

Gillian T

Gillian T.

The PTSDetails: Brain Plasticity and Chronic Stress

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Gillian T

Gillian T.

The PTSDetails: Brain Plasticity and Chronic Stress

BASIS advisor: Ms. Lindsay Wilson
Internship location: ASU, Department of Psychology
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Cheryl D. Conrad, Assistant Vice President of Research Development
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The stress response is vital to an organism’s survival; however, a dysregulated stress response can be deadly. In 2016, The American Institute of Stress reported that 73% of people regularly experience psychological symptoms due to stress, and 77% regularly experience physical symptoms due to stress. Since stress is such a widely experienced issue, be it anywhere from a minor worry to a chronic disorder, understanding stress balance is necessary for optimal health. For my Senior Project, I will partner with Dr. Cheryl Conrad, a professor in the pyschology department at ASU. I will be helping in the Behavioral Neuroscience Research in Stress lab, which aims to look at inhibitory cellular circuitry on chronic stress and resilience. In the lab, mice are chronically stressed using mesh wire restraints, and their brains are examined under a microscope. We then note the impact chronic stress has on their neurons. I also plan to research the topic independently in order to answer the question ‘how does stress influence brain plasticity and resilience?’ I anticipate that stress alters both the size and shape of the rodent’s neurons and the expression of proteins in their brains. Understanding this effect helps us understand how to reverse it, which provides possibility for novel therapeutic treatments for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, which is caused by chronic stress permanently altering brain structures.

Gordon Bruce C

Gordon Bruce C.

Hypergraph Knowledge Representation of Genomic Anomaly Detection

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Gordon Bruce C

Gordon Bruce C.

Hypergraph Knowledge Representation of Genomic Anomaly Detection

BASIS advisor: Mr. Paul McClernon
Internship location: Systems Imagination, Inc.
Onsite Mentor: Mr. David Schneider, IT Director
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The National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Genome Atlas project recently cataloged clinical and genomic data for over ten thousand patients across 33 cancer types. The genomic analysis consists of data on every biological molecule involved in genetic expression, from DNA, to RNA, to the proteins that are ultimately created. While potentially extremely useful, the sheer volume of data (over 450 terabytes) makes it cumbersome for humans to draw significant conclusions about what genetic factors or combinations of factors seem to cause these cancers. The bioinformatics company Systems Imagination proposes one solution to this problem involving the use of hypergraph-based data modeling. Hypergraphs consist of vertices and “hyperedges” which each connect two or more vertices. They are very useful for representing complex, layered data, such as the genomic data used in this project. This data system is developed and applied to bladder cancer data with the goal of representing and visualizing cancer-causing variables, thus allowing for improved cancer analysis and ultimately prevention.

Grace M

Grace M.

Creating Fantasy: An Analysis of the Family Unit in Disney Films

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Grace M

Grace M.

Creating Fantasy: An Analysis of the Family Unit in Disney Films

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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Walt Disney Studios has been widely accepted as a moral educator for today’s youth. However, it is a multibillion dollar company in the American capitalist system. Therefore, to understand Disney’s motivations, its role in the capitalist matrix must analyzed. Capitalism is an economic system founded on consumerism, a vehicle through which people escape the hardships of labor. However, to faciliate their escapism through consumerism, people must continue working. Thus, capitalism perpetuates itself. It is unknown whether Disney is motivated primarily by the propagation of consumerism or morality, begging the question, “Do Walt Disney animated films adhere to Marxist delineations that reinforce the capitalist structure?”A Marxist structure most prevalent in Disney movies is that of the family, which Marx defines as the most foundational class distinction. Therefore, this study makes use of a content analysis and thematic analysis to mark the class distinctions in family to determine what ideology Disney’s movies propagate. Markers of class structure are defined by authority and gender and illustrate if the family follows the Marxist definition. After determining whether a familial structure is Marxist, a thematic analysis evaluated how those distinctions correlated with the cycle of escapism, as created through interactions between parent and child. By combining the two methods, results will articulate power relationships within a family and the effect on a child’s future, ultimately showing whether the content is aligned with the Marxist cycle of consumerism through escapism. Evaluating this alignment will give insight on Disney’s motivations in creating content.

Grady D

Grady D.

Evaluating Clonal Evolution in Multiple Myeloma Progression through qPCR

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Grady D

Grady D.

Evaluating Clonal Evolution in Multiple Myeloma Progression through qPCR

BASIS advisor: Mr. Chris Lester
Internship location: Mayo Clinic
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Daniel Riggs, Cancer Researcher
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Each year, over 400,000 people are diagnosed with multiple myeloma, an incurable form of lymphoma responsible for 80,000 deaths annually. Multiple myeloma is different from other lymphomas because it affects plasma cells–the cells responsible for producing antibodies, which are the proteins that allow our immune systems to identify and respond to pathogens and other dangers. Several important genetic processes allow plasma cells to produce a nearly unlimited variety of antibodies from a limited number of genes. One of these processes, called V(D)J recombination, selects two gene segments from large repertoires of antibody-encoding genes and fuses them into a single gene. Because this gene product is unique and shared by all descendants of the initially-rearranged cell, it can be used as a marker to identify a single plasma cell lineage, or “clone.” For my project, I am designing a quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction assay to quantify the presence of a single clone within a myeloma tumor. By tracking a single clone throughout myeloma progression, we can more accurately determine whether previously-characterized genetic changes that arise throughout myeloma progression are due to novel mutations in the original dominant clone or to a new clone outcompeting the original by natural selection. Through facilitating this type of research, this assay will help researchers rapidly detect clonal evolution and will help clinicians predict patient outcomes more accurately.

Gursajan G

Gursajan G.

Cultural Deception: An analysis of the "Westernization" of foreign culture in America through Japanese animation.

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Gursajan G

Gursajan G.

Cultural Deception: An analysis of the "Westernization" of foreign culture in America through Japanese animation.

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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American media is a global powerhouse. Its influence is so pervasive that most international media has traces of American culture, a phenomenon described by MIT journalist Annalee Newitz as “media imperialism.” However, Japan’s strict regulations on trade have allowed Japanese media to be devoid of much American influence, resulting in “reverse cultural imperialism.” In other words, Japanese media has had a larger cultural impact on American media, not vice-versa. Of Japanese media, anime has emerged as the most prominent representation of reverse cultural imperialism. Anime has grown to be a multi-billion dollar media industry within America. However, before anime can be distributed here, it must be translated through a process known as dubbing—where the Japanese soundtrack is replaced with an English soundtrack. According to Tufts Professor, Susan Napier, when an anime is dubbed, there are various thematic changes that “Americanize” the anime. Although there is a consensus among cultural anthropologists that thematic differences exist between the Americanized and Japanese version of the same anime, there is yet to be any research on what specific themes are changed. This research paper focuses on identifying those themes through a thematic analysis which tracks and evaluates thematic changes across the original and dubbed versions of various anime. Specifically, this research focuses on the largely popular Dragon Ball Z, Cowboy Bebop, and Spirited Away. The thematic changes can give insight into how America interprets Japanese culture. Moreover, this research can broadly reflect how Americans react to foreign culture and media.

Jack B

Jack B.

Genes: The Final Frontier

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Jack B

Jack B.

Genes: The Final Frontier

BASIS advisor: Mr. Chadwick Carey
Internship location: HonorHealth Scottsdale Shea Medical Center
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Atul Lalani, Endrocrinologist
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The wonderful and complex world of medicine is always changing to fit new understandings of how doctors should treat their patients. The field of medicine used to operate on the principle that one medication could work for the same illness in everyone; however, with advances in our understanding of the human body, the need for individualized care is more evident than ever. The First Vitals study is an experiment being carried out at several sites nationally; it aims to take into account an individual’s unique genetic code when prescribing a treatment to ensure that the patient receives the best care possible. Intrigued by this new way of thinking about healthcare, I am interning at HonorHealth Scottsdale Shea Center in the endocrinology department where they are participating in the First Vitals study. I am helping with the research process by inputting data and assisting with various other tasks such as swabbing the patients’ mouths for DNA collection. Ultimately, the goal of this study is to redefine what it means for patients to recieve individualized care.

Julai G

Julia G.

Straightening Out the Facts: An In-Depth Look at Patient Response to Osteopathy

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Julai G

Julia G.

Straightening Out the Facts: An In-Depth Look at Patient Response to Osteopathy

BASIS advisor: Ms. Lauren Cooney
Internship location: Scottsdale Medical Center
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Kelly Barker, DO
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As health and fitness become sources for countless new trends and lifestyles, Osteopathic Medicine is garnering an increasingly larger clientele. Its holistic approach to solving medical problems appeals to many who favor using natural remedies, minimizing costs, and improving their lives. By surveying a large group of patients that see a Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) as their primary care physician, this project will examine how patients view D.O.s and the perceived effects D.O.s have on health and medicine. The questionnaire used will be completed both before and after patient visits, and will address patient values, treatments, successes, shortcomings, and overall health. Additionally, patients who visit the office more frequently will be interviewed more thoroughly for an in-depth look into patient-provider interactions. This research has the potential to validate Osteopathy as a whole, and show how an often under-appreciated approach to medicine can greatly improve primary care.

Justin T

Justin T.

Scaling It Down: The Influence of Weight Loss on Stem Cell Transplant Patients

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Justin T

Justin T.

Scaling It Down: The Influence of Weight Loss on Stem Cell Transplant Patients

BASIS advisor: Mr. Alex Covalciuc
Internship location: Mayo Clinic, Bone Marrow Transplant Program
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Lisa Sproat, Oncologist
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Stem cell transplants are necessary for patients with leukemia. Because leukemia is cancer of the blood, chemotherapy given to treat leukemia targets the bone marrow, the main production site for many components of the blood. Chemotherapy wipes out both healthy and cancerous stem cells, requiring the patient to replenish these stem cells by getting a transplant. The body, already weakened by intense chemotherapy and the operation itself, makes post-transplant complications potentially as lethal as those prior to and during the transplant. In an effort to more accurately predict post-transplant complications, my project examines weight loss as a possibly reliable prognostic factor. In order to do so, I will review Mayo Clinic’s patient records from 2008 to present and collect patient weight data at various stages of the stem cell transplant procedure (before, one hundred days after, and one year after). Following data collection, patient weight loss will be compared against a variety of factors (transplant-related mortality rates, cancer relapse rates, and graft versus host disease) that are indicative of the success of the transplant. Finding a statistically significant correlation would allow physicians to predict and prevent certain post-transplant complications by monitoring patient weight loss.

Kayvon G

Kayvon G.

Inner-City Schools: an Exploration into Sustainable Buildings

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Kayvon G

Kayvon G.

Inner-City Schools: an Exploration into Sustainable Buildings

BASIS advisor: Mr. Alex Covalciuc
Internship location: BlocPower
Onsite Mentor: Mr. Jamil Ellis, CTO
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Since 1999, people living in close proximity to a major pollution source in The Bronx, New York have been 34% more likely to be hospitalized for asthma. This statistic is particularly troubling because Bronx schoolchildren are exposed to high levels of air pollutants in their neighborhoods, causing them long-term respiratory problems. Not only must these schoolchildren face inequities in air quality, but also in their learning of core scientific courses. In recent years, third party companies have attempted to remedy this disparity by holistically evaluating the engineering systems of school buildings in an attempt to improve energy consumption. BlocPower, an organization that gives loans to inner city buildings to build energy projects, is able to accomplish this feat by examining the boiler, heating/cooling, and lighting systems of underserved buildings and then in turn installing cleaner and safer retrofits to reduce potential high energy costs and pollution. My role throughout is to act as both a quality assurance tester and a hands-on rooftop school garden volunteer. In addition to examining the environmental benefits of these retrofits, my project also explores the ways in which these energy improvements have also affected STEM-based curricula in the inner city. I hope that through a close examination of recent case studies and community involvement groups, my project will track how urban solutions to the inner city school problem is expanding from a dialogue about low air quality and poor scientific courses and into a conversation about green education and its nuanced benefits.

Kimy L

Kimy L.

Colonial Corruption: An Analysis of the Impact of British Patriachal Values on Sri Lanka's Matriarchal Society

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Kimy L

Kimy L.

Colonial Corruption: An Analysis of the Impact of British Patriachal Values on Sri Lanka's Matriarchal Society

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag & Jacob Wells
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In 1960 Sirimavo Bandaranaike became the Prime Minister of Sri Lanka, making her the first female Head of State in the world. Such a victory for women’s rights, paired with Sri Lanka’s traditionally matriarchal society, implies that gender equality has already been achieved in the country. However, many Sri Lankan women currently face gender-based violence and discrimination, characteristics commonly associated with patriarchal society. In order to understand the shift from matriarchy to patriarchy, it is imperative to determine the origin of patriarchal values in Sri Lanka. Britain, a traditionally patriarchal society, colonized Sri Lanka in 1815 and maintained control until 1948. Thus, the purpose of this research is to assess the current relationship between matriarchy and patriarchy in Sri Lanka by examining the aftermath of British colonization. In order to assess gender power structures on a country-wide level, this research analyzed country reports from leading international bodies to extract large trends in the treatment of women. To garner further insight, this project uniquely employed phenomenological interviews of women who held various positions within Sri Lankan society. Analyses of data provide insight into how British colonialism shaped the lives of women. Highly respected historians, such as Joan Wallach Scott, assert that “By piling up the evidence about women in the past it refutes the claim that women had no history.” By understanding how Sri Lankan social standards evolved, it becomes easier to spark changes that allow women to obtain fundamental rights.

Kiri C

Kiri C.

It’s All in Your Head: Comparing Structural Brain Changes between Patients with PTH and Healthy Controls

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Kiri C

Kiri C.

It’s All in Your Head: Comparing Structural Brain Changes between Patients with PTH and Healthy Controls

BASIS advisor: Ms. Lindsay Wilson
Internship location: Mayo Clinic
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Catherine D. Chong, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Research Scientist
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According to the Brain Injury Research Institute, approximately 1.6 million to 3.8 million concussions occur each year. Post-traumatic headache (PTH) is said to be the most common symptom following a concussion. The International Headache Society defines PTH as “a headache developing within seven days of the injury or after regaining consciousness.” With physical activity on the rise and an increasing life expectancy, both the young and the old are at risk of receiving a head injury. We do not know the probability of developing PTH after a concussion, but we are hoping a study at Mayo Clinic that compares structural brain changes in PTH patients and healthy controls will provide some answers. As part of my internship at Mayo, I will have the opportunity to act as an observer and get a firsthand look at clinical trials involving PTH patients. Using more advanced computer technology, we will sequence MRI scans in order to segment and parcellate specific areas of the brain. From there, the images will help us to identify the significance of these brain changes as well as provide reasoning for further research. It’s important that coaches, parents, and teachers know what it means to have a concussion and the possible repercussions of getting one. The more people are well-informed about the seriousness of concussions, the better.

Korina B

Korina B.

The Elephant in the Room: Human Impact on Animal Adaptation

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Korina B

Korina B.

The Elephant in the Room: Human Impact on Animal Adaptation

BASIS advisor: Ms. Kaitlyn Mandigo
Internship location: Liberty Wildlife
Onsite Mentor: Ms. Carol Suits, Volunteer Coordinator
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According to the World Wildlife Fund, Earth’s population of wild vertebrates — all mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish — declined 58 percent from 1970 to 2012 (Living Planet Report [LPR], 2016). This massive downtrend is mainly caused by habitat loss and degradation (LPR, 2016). As of 2016, the United States degree of urbanization has increased to 81.6%, taking away the habitat and resources of wildlife (Population Reference Bureau, 2016). Because of this, animals are forced to adapt their behavior in order to properly acclimate to city life and human presence. This project intends to determine how humans have impacted the behavior of species common to Arizona, whether this behavior is detrimental to the animals’ or humans’ safety, and how humans can lessen their influence on the ecosystem. By working with Liberty Wildlife, a rehabilitation center for injured or infant wild animals, it will be possible to study specific Arizonian species and how humans impact their environment. The data collected at Liberty Wildlife, ranging from naturalistic observation to old records of animals brought in, will show in what ways animals have changed their behavior and whether or not the change is detrimental to their safety in urban environments. Through these results, measures can be taken to reduce the pressure of adaptation in the Arizona species and increase safety in human-to-wildlife interaction.

Kristina K

Kristiana K.

Elective C-Sections: Cutting out the Negativity

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Kristina K

Kristiana K.

Elective C-Sections: Cutting out the Negativity

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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In America, traditional childbirth is generally viewed as the quintessential symbol of a woman’s transition into motherhood. Current research suggests that perceived “ideal” motherhood is characterized by sacrifice and selflessness. As such, the experience of a vaginal birth functions as the manifestation of “ideal” motherhood, as it is associated with pain and altruism. However, only two-thirds of births are vaginal, while C-sections account for the remaining third. In fact, the perceptions of C-sections directly contrast those of vaginal births. There exists stigma against C-sections, that women who have C-sections are “weaker” and more “self-centered,” and thus do not align with the perception of “ideal” mothers. The apparent tension between the “ideal” birthing experience and C-Sections could potentially be the source of the stigma against C-sections. This project aims to determine if there is in fact a correlation between the stigma against C-sections and the perception of an “ideal” mother, prompting the question, “How do people’s views of women who have C-sections correlate with their understanding of ideal womanhood and motherhood?” To find a possible link between the two viewpoints, a quantitative and qualitative questionnaire was designed to explore themes corresponding to birth and motherhood. By understanding people’s attitudes towards birth and motherhood, this research could potentially identify the source of stigma against C-section, which is the first important step in reversing its impacts. By mitigating stigma, women can objectively choose birthing procedures that are optimal for their individual medical history.

Lauren R

Lauren R.

Do You Buy It? Ethics Behind Labeling in the Dermatology Industry

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Lauren R

Lauren R.

Do You Buy It? Ethics Behind Labeling in the Dermatology Industry

BASIS advisor: Dr. Allison Scaling
Internship location: Dermache Labs & Imiloa Skin Care Creations
Onsite Mentor: Ms. Erin Wright; Mr. Kerwin Yamanaka, Marketing Manager; Manager and Cosmetic Formula Consultant
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Do you buy it? What impact does product labeling play in consumer behavior? There are certain standards that companies must meet to be able to use specific labels, but these standards might not always mean what consumers may innocently assume. For instance, is a product labeled ‘all natural’ solely made of natural ingredients, or does it only hit benchmark levels? In my project I am looking at the ethics behind labeling on dermatology product through my internships with both Dermarche Labs, an up-and-coming dermatology products company, and Imiloa Skin Care Solutions, a dermatology product development company. At Imiloa Skin Care Solutions, I am creating two new skincare formulations, and I am also designing graphics for packaging. Surveying a large populous of millennials will help answer if dermatological products’ packaging impacts consumer purchasing behaviors. I am excited to explore a potential career in marketing chemical products. I am confident that this research will reveal a novel part of consumer behavior, specifically regarding how labeling may be a larger determinant than ingredients when it comes to consumer purchases. A larger question I am hoping to answer is if consumers are actually affected by these labels. After considering consumer responses to my survey, I want to see if consumers actually use these labels to impact their purchasing behaviors. In turn, I hope to determine if dermatology companies can use specific labeling strategies to influence consumer purchases, both ethically and unethically.

Liam C

Liam C.

Knowledge: What You Need to Know

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Liam C

Liam C.

Knowledge: What You Need to Know

BASIS advisor: Mr. Travis Lambert
Internship location: ASU, School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Gopal Nair, Assistant Professor
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In the modern day, we are bombarded with information from a myriad of sources around the world. Whether it be the local news channel, school, a colleague or friend, information can come from almost anywhere. With this natural abundance of information, we may ask ourselves, how much of it do we really need? Although not all information is necessary, a lot of it is certainly interesting and can seem useful to know in raising awareness of the events happening around the world. I will be researching into this topic to find out what types of knowledge are important or necessary to have within our modern democratic society. In order to do this, I will be reading a variety of philosophers, ranging from the classical to the modern era, and analyze their views and justifications on the topic. Using their views on the topic, I will make a conclusion about what types of knowledge are necessary to have within our society as well as for the individual. This project aims to shed light on how important or necessary certain types of knowledge are, as well as uncover whether knowledge that we believe is important now is really as crucial as we claim it to be.

Lucia W

Lucia W.

A Linguistic Analysis of Virtual Anorexia

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Lucia W

Lucia W.

A Linguistic Analysis of Virtual Anorexia

BASIS advisor: Lyndasy Haag
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Anorexia Nervosa is a serious and potentially deadly eating disorder defined as a severe restriction of caloric intake in order to achieve an extremely low weight. For a sense of belonging and support, people suffering from anorexia turn to websites that advocate for anorexia as an acceptable lifestyle. In contrast to pro-anorexia content, pro-recovery content provides those suffering from anorexia with support to overcome their eating disorders. Thus, these two opposing online communities function as a representation of those who are in the throes of anorexia and those who are overcoming anorexia. However, it is unclear how the language of these users reflects the features of someone who is suffering versus someone who is in recovery. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to analyze pro-anorexia and pro-recovery pages on Tumblr in order to discover behavioral markers, which provide insight into the thought process of a patient with anorexia in the different stages of recovery. The research used a text analysis program, LIWC, to analyze the affective, behavioral, cognitive, and linguistic style attributes of microblogs on Tumblr categorized as either pro-anorexia or pro-recovery. Such an analysis will reveal distinctive characteristics for both communities that could potentially be used as markers for the treatment of the mental disorder. Ultimately, the research is important for facilitating healthy recovery for people suffering from anorexia.

Luke F

Luke F.

Do You Hear That? Detecting Diseases from Speech Patterns

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Luke F

Luke F.

Do You Hear That? Detecting Diseases from Speech Patterns

BASIS advisor: Dr. Mitra Sahu
Internship location: ASU, Department of Speech and Hearing Science
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Visar Berisha, Assistant Professor
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With current methods, the diagnosis of diseases by professionals is based on the expressed symptoms observable to the professional. Because of this dependence on humans and the training or focus of the professional, diagnosis and description of the severity of a disease is largely subjective. This is where computers come in. In an attempt to change this subjective assessment to an objective one – so that diagnosis is more reliable and understandable – devices and algorithms which look at samples of speech to make a diagnosis are being developed. This project looks at the different strategies of using computers to analyze speech. The analysis of speech can gather many things about the speaker, from age to race; this project focuses on the severity or even the existence of a disease. With traits of speech like speaking rate, pitch, and articulation, the severities of a disease like Parkinson’s can be objectively determined. Another method is through the cough. Similar techniques can be used to look at the characteristics of a cough and what the implications of that cough may be. My goal in this project is to understand the complexity of such algorithms and possibly contribute to the making of one. There are many unexplored speech characteristics, which could improve a computer’s decision making, and I attempt to help develop algorithms for those characteristics, specifically focusing on the cough.

Manu V

Manu V.

Can Money and Medicine Mesh? The Impact of a Shifting Medical Industry Upon Doctors

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Manu V

Manu V.

Can Money and Medicine Mesh? The Impact of a Shifting Medical Industry Upon Doctors

BASIS advisor: Mr. TJ Peacher
Internship location: Banner Medical Group
Onsite Mentor: Mr. Chad Cornell, CFO
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The medical field is a three trillion dollar industry, yet despite its size, it remains incredibly inefficient. To address this problem, the field is rapidly shifting its model of care. Patients are no longer seen as people in need, but as consumers receiving a service. The government incentivizes doctors and hospitals with monetary rewards for achieving quality metrics, such as healthy hemoglobin A1C levels, healthy blood pressures, etc. This change impacts how doctors work. Doctors benefit from spending more time with their patients to ensure that they are healthy. However, there are many shortcomings to this medical system, including higher expenses for hospitals, and an increase in doctors overtreating patients to ensure that they attain these metrics. I will specifically be analyzing how Banner Medical Group addresses the movement in healthcare towards value-based care and how it modifies its business model in order to account for these changes. I expect to find that the administration will place less pressure on primary care physicians to maximize their number of patients seen per day. Instead, Banner will most likely keep track of key performance indicators such as readmittance rates and the likelihood of patients to recommend physicians to others and motivate providers to reach higher bars in terms of these indicators instead of encouraging them to see as many patients as possible. My project will explore the transformation of medical care and how the medical industry can eliminate the extreme inefficiencies it has faced in the past.

Max R

Max R.

Jacking Up Gambling Behavior: An Exploration of Behavioral Influences on Blackjack Players

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Max R

Max R.

Jacking Up Gambling Behavior: An Exploration of Behavioral Influences on Blackjack Players

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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Gambling is a rapidly growing industry, with yearly profits upwards of $182 billion. Such a monumental figure is the culmination of individual consumers’ gambling habits. To entice gamblers to increase betting by engaging in riskier behavior, casinos exploit people’s innate suggestibility. The three main tactics which have been shown to increase risky betting behavior are time pressure, when gamblers are given limited time; near-misses, when gamblers begin to gain confidence in their skills; and priming, when subconscious signals influence gamblers. Current research is limited in that it considers each effect in isolation; therefore, it is unknown which of these influences has the strongest impact on eliciting risky behavior. Blackjack provides a poignant context for examining these effects since players have to make either risky or risk-averse choices when faced with ambiguous hands. Thus, this research aimed to determine which effect was the strongest influencer of adult Blackjack behavior. To measure the influence of each effect, an experiment separated participants into four groups: control, time-pressure, near-miss, and priming. First, participants were given a survey to measure riskiness, to ensure that the results could not be attributed to one group’s proclivity toward risky behavior. Thereafter, participants were given an ambiguous hand directly after being exposed to the effect, and their betting behavior was observed. Results were compared across the groups to identify trends in increased riskiness as correlated with a particular effect. This research can provide insight into the causes of risk-taking, ultimately expanding the knowledge of behavioral psychology.

Michelle G

Michelle G.

How Representatives are Represented: Portrayal of State Legislators in the Media

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Michelle G

Michelle G.

How Representatives are Represented: Portrayal of State Legislators in the Media

BASIS advisor: Mr. Chris Lester
Internship location: Arizona House of Representatives
Onsite Mentor: Representative Michelle Ugenti-Rita, Arizona State Representative
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People often complain of political gridlock and stagnant congresses, but state legislatures continue to pass important pieces of legislation affecting our communities. Despite this, news from state legislatures continues to be undervalued by constituents; few understand what is currently occurring in state House of Representatives and Senate, save a few scandals and controversial bills. My research focuses on different representations of the local Arizona government, from news, television, and the government itself, and to understand how these affect the opinion of state legislation and indifference towards these policies. As committees draft and propose bills, I will track how they are reported by local news and newspapers and by the government to its citizens. Meanwhile, I will compare the overall process of legislation to the representations of government in film and television. Finally, I will use surveys to assess the current public opinion of the state legislature and of constituents’ awareness of bills being currently passed in the state legislature. These representations of state legislature and local government relate to how we perceive them. By understanding the role the government and mainstream media play in these perceptions, we can maintain higher awareness to the actions at our state legislature, where bills that affect our community are passed. Furthermore, by studying the state House of Representatives in particular, I will be able to see the viewpoint of legislators whose terms are more liable to the will of the people, where image is highly important to reelection.

Nathan J

Nathan J.

Cliques and Stones: Relating Minimum Degree to the Optimal Pebbling Number in Graphs

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Nathan J

Nathan J.

Cliques and Stones: Relating Minimum Degree to the Optimal Pebbling Number in Graphs

BASIS advisor: Ms. Marizza Bailey
Internship location: ASU, School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Andzrej Czygrinow, Associate Professor
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A graph is a mathematical object consisting of the abstract notions of vertices and edges, where the vertices represent objects, and the edges connecting certain pairs of vertices may represent any sort of relation between those objects. As such, graph theory allows us to model any imaginable network, giving us the power to illuminate more complex and obscure concepts within fields such as chemistry, biology, informational studies, and artificial intelligence by providing a more structural approach. On campus at Arizona State University, I am currently researching graph theory concepts to apply them to more practical systems. Specifically, my research will look at an area of interest in graph theory called pebbling, which involves the very simple idea of transferring pebbles between vertices by moving them along the edges of a graph. The idea of pebbling on graphs can be used most directly to represent the transportation of resources. For example, the pebbles may represent fuel containers, and as pebbles are moved along edges, some amount of pebbles are lost, signifying the cost of transporting the fuel. By looking at certain properties of graphs and how they relate to the efficiency of moving pebbles along edges in order to reach particular vertices, I hope to be able to discover more about how to effectively construct and manage specific types of networks.

Nichole K

Nichole K.

Unearthing the Truth: Disease Patterns and Social Organizations in Nubia

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Nichole K

Nichole K.

Unearthing the Truth: Disease Patterns and Social Organizations in Nubia

BASIS advisor: Ms. Brittany Silbaugh
Internship location: ASU, School of Human Evolution & Social Change
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Brenda Baker, Associate Professor
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Extending along the Nile River from the First Cataract at Aswan, Egypt, to the Sixth Cataract north of Khartoum, Sudan, the Kingdom of Nubia has long been the subject of study for archaeologists. Cataracts refer to rocky areas of rapids that disturb the flow of the Nile River. Though Nubia has been given less attention than ancient Egypt by archaeologists, Nubia had a long and complicated relationship with Egypt in which both kingdoms heavily influenced each other. My project takes place in Dr. Baker’s Bioarchaeology of Nubia Expedition (BONE) lab where the cleaning and labeling of skeletal remains occur. These remains have been excavated from the El-Ginefab School Site, a large cemetery next to the El-Ginefab Village in Northern Sudan. Besides cleaning and labeling the skeletons, the methodology of the research project consists of going through written field records on grave sites and creating data sets with that information. The R Programming language, a computer language used for statistical computing and data analysis, will be used to check for patterns in the burials and skeletal remains. From this analysis of the burials and remains, the project aims to discover social roles and organizations present in Nubia, patterns in burial orientation, and possibly differences in health status between genders.

Nicole D

Nicole D.

Revisiting Democracy: An Exploration of Athens and America

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Nicole D

Nicole D.

Revisiting Democracy: An Exploration of Athens and America

BASIS advisor: Ms. Lauren Brooks
Internship location: Senator Jeff Flake's Phoenix Office
Onsite Mentor: Mr. Blake Farnsworth, Constituent Services Representative
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The history of democracy can be traced back to ancient Athens, and though the United States is a republic, democratic values exist at its heart. Using Classical civilizations as a point of context, this project examines the relation between infrastructure and political efficacy. I look to various regions of the United States, with an emphasis on Arizona, to explore this connection. My research aims to determine how certain resources affect political participation and citizens’ belief in their government’s legitimacy. Through constituent interviews, the aid of Senator Flake’s staff, as well as the examination of academic papers in the field, this project takes a step toward understanding the link between democracy and the resources available to citizens. The result will be a proposal of how best to understand and solve the problems related to political efficacy in areas with poor or deteriorating infrastructure, particularly in regards to the internet. Ultimately, this project aims to add a new weight to the importance of infrastructure by tying it to voter turnout, while adding additional pressure for a solution.

Rema T

Rema T.

The Neoliberal Warrior: Analyzing the Neoliberal and Feminist Messages of Lululemon's Video Advertisements

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Rema T

Rema T.

The Neoliberal Warrior: Analyzing the Neoliberal and Feminist Messages of Lululemon's Video Advertisements

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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According to current research, women in athletics often occupy dual “masculine” and “feminine” identities. Such fractured identities culminate in decreased feelings of self-worth. However, Lululemon Athletica, a leading women’s sportswear company, claims to have created a safe space for athletic women by blending the masculinity typically associated with athletics and the femininity associated with womanhood, contrasting the common experience of a woman in athletics. Lululemon creates the aforementioned environment through neoliberalism. However, neoliberalism — which proclaims that through decision-making and self-improvement, people choose success — is often corrupted in its relation to feminism when used in marketing. Neoliberal advertisements have the potential to place the onus of failure to improve one’s body or lifestyle on consumers, resulting in harmful psychological behaviors and attitudes. Thus, the supposed safe space that Lululemon creates for women could be tainted by the company subscribing to the detrimental subsection of neoliberalism, particularly because the company relies heavily on video advertisements on social media. This research seeks to determine if Lululemon’s advertisements purport a feminist message that empowers its consumers or a neoliberal message that places blame on the consumer for her body. Through directed coding in a content analysis, all of the linguistic and visual cues of Lululemon’s advertisements were coded to identify neoliberal markers for empowerment and blame. These findings will confirm the nature of Lululemon’s neoliberal message, which will provide insight into whether Lululemon creates a safe space for women in athletics that would allow them to merge their dual identities.

Robert P

Robert P.

Putting the Pieces Together: The Puzzle of Special Education

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Robert P

Robert P.

Putting the Pieces Together: The Puzzle of Special Education

BASIS advisor: Mr. Robert Witz
Internship location: Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center (SARRC)
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Christopher J. Smith, Vice President, Director of Research
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The puzzle piece has been the national symbol for autism since the early 1960s, representing the mystery and complexity behind this disorder. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, autism has been one of the fastest growing developmental disabilities in the country, affecting as many as 1 in 68 children in the United States alone. Although data suggests that known methods like the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) or the Peer Network System (PNS), assist students in their development, positive results are not guaranteed. At SARRC, the Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center, researchers use their knowledge and evidence about autism to diagnose children at an early age, so that a plan can be made to help nurture and better educate these children. It is essential that we screen and diagnose the cases early, in order to have more specialized treatments. By observing the diagnostic sessions along with the treatment plans they offer, this will help build my understanding of what may improve the social skills of children with autism. And with the vast database of past clients, I will be able to access some of that information to infer on what methods may have worked in the past. This project explores the methods used to identify early signs of autism as well as the most effective ways to educate and treat them, hoping to add one more piece to solving the puzzle of autism.

Saara K

Saara K.

Normal yet Stigmatized: An Analysis of Adolescent Reactions to the Marketing of Menstrual Products

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Saara K

Saara K.

Normal yet Stigmatized: An Analysis of Adolescent Reactions to the Marketing of Menstrual Products

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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Menstruation is a normal, healthy process for women, yet according to current research, many women experience stigma and shame in regards to their periods. Much of the stigma stems from a lack of education surrounding menstruation, which leads women to educate themselves through media. Advertisements are an inherently persuasive form of media, and as such, have a substantial influence on women’s perceptions of menstruation. Adolescents are particularly susceptible to such influence, given that they are shaping their views on menstruation post-menarche. This study evaluates whether the marketing of menstrual products today contributes to adolescents girls’ attitudes toward menstruation. To understand how the advertisements affect adolescent perceptions of menstruation, this research will make use of a two-pronged approach: a content analysis and a questionnaire. To determine the nature of the commercials, a coded content analysis made use of markers for insecurity and empowerment. From the content analysis, advertisements that prominently exhibited either empowerment or shame were selected to show participants. To quantify the effect of advertisements on the consumer, a Likert-scale questionnaire was administered to three groups of participants: a group exposed to empowering commercials, a groups exposed to shameful commercials, and a control group. The results will be compared to provide insight into the correlation between exposure to period commercials and adolescent attitudes towards menstruation. Understanding the role that advertisements play in shaping perceptions is a key step in reversing the stigma against menstruation.

Saleena K

Saleenjit K.

Psych-Busters: Uncovering the Truth One Disorder at a Time

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Saleena K

Saleenjit K.

Psych-Busters: Uncovering the Truth One Disorder at a Time

BASIS advisor: Mr. Chadwick Carey
Internship location: A New Beginning Outpatient Treatment Center, LLC
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Julie T. Anne, Founder, Clinical Director
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Anxiety. Depression. Obesity. These are words that we regularly hear in today’s society, but never fully understand. Psychological disorders are increasingly prevalent; 18% of our national population is currently affected (Anxiety and Depression Association of America, 2016). But as the number of people who suffer from these mental disorders increases, so does the amount of ambiguity and misconceptions surrounding them. With the help of the clinical therapists and nutritional dieticians at A New Beginning, we are shedding light on a new mental health issue every week, from substance abuse to anorexia. By researching case-studies on different psychological disorders and receiving a clinical point of view from A New Beginning’s specialized team, we can recognize misconceptions, and share the truth behind some of the most common disorders in modern society. In addition to shedding light on different disorders, I will review popular media and books to find the root of the misconceptions. In today’s world, these disorders are increasingly prevalent, but minimally discussed. This project will provide insight to the general public on the reality of these disorders, helping to reduce the social stigmas and to encourage people to reach out for help.

Sarah H

Sarah H.

Building Character and Houses: Youth Outreach for Habitat for Humanity

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Sarah H

Sarah H.

Building Character and Houses: Youth Outreach for Habitat for Humanity

BASIS advisor: Dr. Mitra Sahu
Internship location: Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona
Onsite Mentor: Ms. Cassandra Jarles, Director of Sponsor Relations
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In America, poverty and homelessness are sometimes associated more with developing countries than with our own. However, in January 2015, 564,708 people were homeless on a given night in the United States. Of that number, 206,286 were people in families (National Alliance to End Homelessness). Habitat for Humanity, an international nonprofit organization, seeks to build and finance housing for low-income families within local communities, trying to attain the goal of affordable housing. Although Habitat tries to use all available resources, children cannot volunteer at the ReStore until they are 15, or at the builds until they are 16, so there is little for children under 15 to do. I am working with the Arizona chapter of Habitat for Humanity to develop a youth outreach program intended to spread awareness and engage children and teenagers in the Habitat for Humanity organization. In this role, I will determine the best methods to engage children in Habitat for Humanity even though they are not yet old enough to volunteer and also discuss the benefits to doing youth outreach. Although Habitat for Humanity has existing methods of youth outreach, many have not been implemented within the Arizona chapter. With my project, I hope to consolidate all of the Arizona affiliate’s youth outreach efforts into one program, which will hopefully be able to build and fundraise a house in the future.

Serena N

Serena N.

Sleep Deprivation and Schizophrenia

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Serena N

Serena N.

Sleep Deprivation and Schizophrenia

BASIS advisor: Ms. Lydia Reznik
Internship location: UofA, College of Medicine
Onsite Mentor: Ms. Janet Campbell; Mr. Derek Reznik, Laboratory Manager; Undergraduate Research Assistant
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Schizophrenia is a rare but serious mental illness that is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Dr. Amelia Gallitano, MD, PhD at The University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix is looking at both of these factors to study the condition. Mice, modified to have a specific gene turned off, are being used to model schizophrenia. This gene, EGR3, is called an immediate early gene, which are a group of genes that are turned on in response to environmental changes, and can cause changes in behavior. Past experiments by the Gallitano lab show that mice with this gene turned off react poorly to novel situations. The Gallitano lab has also performed experiments where these mice and normal mice were sleep-deprived in order to stress them, after which their brains were sliced and stained to observe certain changes to EGR3 and a gene involved in serotonin receptor production. It is hoped that using animal models, such as these genetically altered mice, to better understand both the genetic and environmental components of the disease will allow for better treatment for humans suffering from schizophrenia in the future.

Sergio C

Sergio C.

Are You What You Tweet? Evaluating Twitter Through the Social-Cognitive Perspective

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Sergio C

Sergio C.

Are You What You Tweet? Evaluating Twitter Through the Social-Cognitive Perspective

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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People are increasingly using social media to communicate with each other. According to Social-Cognitive Theory, external influences, such as social media, can affect human behavior. In fact, current research suggests that social media promotes antisocial behavior in people. Social media, however, exists in conversation with another social context: the real-world events discussed on the platform. Thus, the current research is limited in that it considers social media as the sole external influence, which prompts the question,  “Do social media or real world events have a stronger influence on human behavior?” This research performed a linguistic analysis of Twitter using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), examining various hashtags concerning current events that would elicit certain behaviors. Analyses were performed on a controversy, as controversies tend to promote antisocial behavior; a tragedy, as tragedies tend to promote prosocial behavior; and a control group, as it would provide a sample of typical behavior on social media. To represent the aforementioned groups, the hashtags #PrayforParis and #BlackLivesMatter were evaluated as a tragedy and controversy, respectively. If the tragedy and controversy show commensurate levels of antisocial behavior to the control group, then the social media platform is the stronger external influence; however, if the tragedy and controversy elicit unique levels of pro and antisocial behavior, then the real-world context is the stronger external influence. Findings will give insight into how pervasively social media affects its users, which is particularly important given its widespread use. (241)

Shreya V

Shreya V.

Lobbying for Likes: Transforming Social Perceptions of Lobbyists

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Shreya V

Shreya V.

Lobbying for Likes: Transforming Social Perceptions of Lobbyists

BASIS advisor: Mr. Dana Johnson
Internship location: Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Onsite Mentor: Mr. Glenn Hamer, Director
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Otto von Bismarck once said, “To retain respect for sausages and laws, one must not watch them in the making.” This negative view about the legislative process is one commonly held by the general public, particularly when lobbyists are involved. Lobbyists are plainly agents of change—they speak to legislators in an effort to shape policies for what they believe is positive change. Though there are some lobbyists who act out of greed or corruption in questionable ways, most lobbyists are indispensable to the legislative process, giving some speed to the slow-moving body that is the government. Besides providing me with firsthand experiences with lobbying at the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, my project will address these views, analyzing the negative social perceptions associated with lobbyists by surveying the public, elected officials, and lobbyists themselves about their perceptions of lobbying. In these surveys, participants will be asked to rate their satisfaction with an unnamed lobbyist’s work (presented as a short vignette). Elected officials and lobbyists who have better experience with these issues will be given more obscure stories of lobbyists’ work to minimize bias. Finally, participants will be asked to rate their overall impression of lobbying along with a rating of how significant they believe lobbying is in the legislative process. Using this research, we hope to discover how to improve this problem and hopefully, work to transform negative perceptions of lobbyists.

Spencer V

Spencer V.

Inbound Marketing: Proven Methodology for the Digital Age

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Spencer V

Spencer V.

Inbound Marketing: Proven Methodology for the Digital Age

BASIS advisor: Dr. Mitra Sahu
Internship location: AppointmentPlus
Onsite Mentor: Ms. Anati Zubia, Director of Marketing
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Attracting consumers solely offline is no longer viable. According to Retailing Today, 81% of shoppers conduct online research before making big purchases. The message is clear. Consumer behavior changes, and most often with technology. However, while e-commerce helps attract sales leads, conversion remains a larger issue. Traditional marketing strategies outline what is known as the Buyer’s Journey. A consumer is led through three stages: Awareness, Consideration, and Decision. In other words, someone discovers a product or service, considers a purchase, and finally chooses to do so. An often overlooked and vital tool is video. Most marketing techniques cannot get someone to pass the first or even second stage. Video is unique in how engaging it is, and it enables prospective leads to become qualified sales leads. At this point, video can be crucial. I will be examining how video can be used in each stage of the Buyer’s Journey and explain as to why it is such an effective tool and asset. This project will seek to report the importance and effectiveness of video in marketing.

Srihari I

Srihari I.

Need a Hand? A look into Prosthetic Design

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Srihari I

Srihari I.

Need a Hand? A look into Prosthetic Design

BASIS advisor: Ms. Megan Mitrovich
Internship location: ASU, Neural Control of Movement Laboratory
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Marco Santello; Dr. Quishi Fu, Research Director; Assistant Professor
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Can you imagine a day without using your hand? Often, we take its many functions for granted: turning a doorknob, greeting someone, or holding the railings on a staircase. However, for many, these tasks present daily challenges. According to a 2008 study by St. Olaf College, there are nearly 2 million people living with limb loss in the U.S. alone. Prosthetics have advanced rapidly in recent years in an effort to achieve the complete functionality of their organic counterparts. My project looks at a current prosthetic model, the Softhand Pro device, to gain insight into future innovations and enhancements. Using the MuJo Haptix simulation software and the Myo Armband device to record muscle activity, I will compare data obtained from a prosthetic hand and my own hand. I will observe how well the Softhand Pro device has replicated the functions of its organic counterpart. Through controlled simulations, I will vary an object’s weight to record muscle and device activity and analyze the response to different levels of force. This study will show the effectiveness and downfalls of the Softhand Pro in reference to the motor function of grasping. Concurrent with this project, I will perform a study on social attitudes towards prosthetics in general. I hope my findings will provide valuable knowledge that will assist in overcoming the physical challenges and social stigma faced by those who use prosthetics.

Stirling M

Stirling M.

Identity Matters: Examining the Efficacy of LGBTQ Youth Programs

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Stirling M

Stirling M.

Identity Matters: Examining the Efficacy of LGBTQ Youth Programs

BASIS advisor: Mr. Jacob Wells
Internship location: One N Ten, Phoenix Youth Center
Onsite Mentor: Mr. Mike Schneider, Program Coordinator
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LGBTQ teens account for 40% of homeless youth, are far more likely to experience bullying and abuse at home and school, and are four times more likely to attempt suicide than heterosexual and cisgender youth (CDC, 2013). One N Ten works to counteract those alarming statistics by providing a Youth Center where LGBTQ youth aged 14-24 can laugh, relax, and engage with one another in a welcoming space. Belonging to a supportive community and taking part in One n Ten’s programming can make a huge difference for these youth. Monday through Thursday, I spend four hours per day interacting with the youth, participating in group meetings and talking with staff and volunteers to assess how effective One N Ten’s programs are in promoting optimistic futures. The results of my observations, interviews, and data will all be compared with the conclusions of the national and regional studies I have compiled.

Sunskruthi K

Sunskruthi K.

Neurofeedback Therapy Viability for ADHD Patients: Adults and Children

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Sunskruthi K

Sunskruthi K.

Neurofeedback Therapy Viability for ADHD Patients: Adults and Children

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
Internship location: Scottsdale Neurofeedback Institute
Onsite Mentor: James Murray, Neurofeedback Technician
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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a widespread mental disorder that affects people around the world. In order to treat ADHD,  doctors most prescribe medication; however, the use of medicine has been widely critiqued for its expensive price, adverse health effects, and only short-term improvement. Mitigating the drawbacks of medication, neurofeedback therapy (NFT) provides a promising new treatment for ADHD that involves the cheaper, noninvasive use of computer programming, where patients perform brain exercises to improve concentration and consciously control brainwaves. However, given the novelty of NFT, there is a significant lack of research on its efficacy in different populations. Specifically, it is unknown how effective NFT is in treating children and adults, which is important, considering that the severity of ADHD symptoms manifests differently in children and adults. This research aims to compare the efficacy of NFT in adult and child ADHD patients. A cross-sectional, retrospective study, relying on patient records from adults and children, analyzed whether there was a correlation between increased NFT sessions and reduced ADHD symptoms, evaluating the relative effectiveness of NFT between children and adults. Based on scores from comparable, standardized diagnostic measures of ADHD (the Tests of Variable Attention for children and Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test for adults), a paired t-test statistical method calculated the trend of improvement to determine which group most benefited from the therapy. This information will ultimately help ensure that the right age group will receive the most beneficial treatment.

Tanmyaa G

Tanmyaa G.

Building Boardwalk: Commercial Real Estate Finance and Economic Development

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Tanmyaa G

Tanmyaa G.

Building Boardwalk: Commercial Real Estate Finance and Economic Development

BASIS advisor: Mr. Dana Johnson
Internship location: Churchill Commercial Capital
Onsite Mentor: Ms. Cynthia Hammond, CMB, President, CEO
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When you hear the term “real estate,” the first thoughts that come to mind are likely residential: buying or selling a home or renting apartments. However, the process we see is just one small part of a bigger picture. Any real estate development, residential or commercial, has immediate and long term effects on the surrounding area. This project aims to evaluate the complex real estate process and its connection to economic development in an urban environment. The negotiation and execution of any real estate deal starts with loans and market predictions. It continues with consideration of public response, local government requirements, and legal obligations. Other factors may include the demographics and property valuations of the surrounding area. Successful real estate investment is closely tied to future economic development, indicators of which are increases in property value and income. My project will be completed at Churchill Commercial Capital, a local mortgage broker, following them as they work through commercial real estate deals from creation of initial loan request to final closing of a deal. This analysis will assess the economic impact of real estate investment in an area, and the extent to which property value and income serve as effective indicators.

Urmi M

Urmi M.

Within Pediatrics: It's a Family Matter

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Urmi M

Urmi M.

Within Pediatrics: It's a Family Matter

BASIS advisor: Ms. Michelle Conner
Internship location: Cardon Children's Medical Center & Banner Health Pediatric Surgery
Onsite Mentor: Ms. Melissa Rothlisberger; Dr. Ravindra Vegunta, NICU RN Senior Clinical Manager; Pediatric Surgeon
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According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 1 out of 10 babies in the United States were born prematurely in 2015. It is imperative that families be informed and involved throughout their baby’s treatment as they can play a vital role in the his or her recovery. Family Centered Care is an approach where the family and healthcare providers work together in a mutual partnership to provide the most beneficial treatment for the child. Although it is implemented in many ways, at its core, Family Centered Care is defined as respecting the family’s culture and background, providing unbiased and important information, encouraging families to help make decisions in the patient’s care, and collaborating in policy and program development (IPFCC, 2000). Previous research has found that Family Centered Care practices have in fact improved the survival and recovery rates of pediatric patients, but there is limited information about how and to what extent healthcare providers put this concept into practice. (March of Dimes Foundation, 2007). This project aims to examine how much Family Centered Care is utilized between two different age groups within pediatric care (infants and children) by shadowing and interviewing staff, nurses, nurse practitioners,and pediatric professionals from the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) facility and the Pediatric Surgery Clinic at Cardon Children’s Medical Center. The goal of this project is to determine how Family Centered Care is implemented and the challenges that pediatric facilities face in implementing this approach.

Ved N

Ved N.

Controller the Consumer: An Analysis of Persuasive Birth Control Advertisements on Consumer Choice

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Ved N

Ved N.

Controller the Consumer: An Analysis of Persuasive Birth Control Advertisements on Consumer Choice

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
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Pharmaceutical companies spend more money on Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) advertising than on research and development of drugs, indicating that their priorities are more geared toward profit than producing optimal treatment options. The practice of DTC advertising is problematic, as consumers could heed the advice of advertisements over that of a physician. Given the conflict of interest between pharmaceutical companies’ agendas and the potential of advertisements to inform patient choice, patients are at risk for consuming drugs that are not medically advantageous. The birth control industry is especially interesting to analyze, as it is classified as a lifestyle, or nonessential, medication, but DTC advertisements portray it as medically necessary. Furthermore, birth control has adverse side effects, which are often deemphasized in DTC advertisements, possibly misinforming the consumer. To understand how DTC advertisements affect consumer perceptions of birth control, this research will use a two pronged approach: a content analysis and a survey. The content analysis will analyze the features of the advertisements to isolate the prominent techniques employed. Through a time-based analysis, specific advertisements that devote the largest percentage of time to each feature will be selected to show participants. To quantify the effect of advertisements on the consumer, a Likert-scale survey will be administered to a group of participants. The results will then be compared to those of a control group, who will take the same survey without watching advertisements. Thus, the comparison will provide insight into the correlation between exposure to advertisements and consumer understanding of products.

Vjay N

Vijay N.

Don't be a Square: Magic Square of Squares

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Vjay N

Vijay N.

Don't be a Square: Magic Square of Squares

BASIS advisor: Ms. Marizza Bailey
Internship location: ASU, School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences
Onsite Mentor: Dr. John Jones, Professor
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Have you ever wondered if squares are magical? A magic square is an array of numbers in which the columns, rows and diagonals add up to the same number. Mathematicians have wondered if it is possible to make a “3-by-3 magic square of squares,” a 3-by-3 magic square where the number in each box is the square of an integer. Working within the math department at Arizona State University, I will be researching the properties that would need to be satisfied by such a magic square, thereby identifying whether such a magic square could exist. It might be possible to prove that a magic square exists by trying to generate one. Or, it might be possible to prove that a magic square of squares cannot exist by “modding out” entries to see what arrangements of entries are not possible. This is certainly a very difficult problem; mathematicians have worked on this problem for quite a long time and have still not solved it. Although the problem has yet to be solved, mathematicians have made progress by finding necessary conditions for such a square. I will be using number theory, and in particular, modular arithmetic to find more necessary problems and using computer programs to generate similar magic squares. Number theoretic results have applications to cryptography and coding theory, allowing data to pass safely through the internet without being confiscated.

Yash P

Yash P.

HemaDrop: Creating Uniform Thin Solid Films for Microliter Blood Analysis

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Yash P

Yash P.

HemaDrop: Creating Uniform Thin Solid Films for Microliter Blood Analysis

BASIS advisor: Lyndsay Haag
Internship location: ASU
Onsite Mentor: Dr. Herbots, Professor
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Blood tests are the most common diagnostic activity. However, some current blood analysis techniques necessitate large volumes of liquid blood, which can cause fatigue and fainting, and even hospital-acquired anemia in critically ill patients. As liquid, small-volume analysis has not achieved satisfactory accuracy for implementation, solid blood analysis provides a promising alternative method. This study evaluates HemaDrop™, a proprietary analysis technique that solidifies blood drops into thin films on hyper-hydrophilic surfaces. However, concerns inherent in solidifying blood plague the accuracy of traditional solid blood analysis techniques. Specifically, blood can dry non-uniformly, increasing error, as not every spot would have identical composition. Moreover, since blood dries on a substrate, questions about increased drying time and cost. Thus, this research aims to optimize test accuracy, drying time, and cost of samples prepared via HemaDrop™ by manipulating the surface’s hyper-hydrophilicity. This experiment manipulated surface hydrophilicity to find the optimal substrate-coating combination. After two of each combination were prepared, Three-Liquid Contact Angle Analysis characterized one of each pair of samples to quantitatively characterize hydrophilicity. Next, blood was applied to each sample’s counterpart, while qualitative observations coded for markers of disuniformity. Finally, Ion Beam Analysis was performed on two spots of each sample to compare elemental composition and thus measure uniformity. Optimizing HemaDrop™ creates a cost-efficient and accurate method for small-volume blood analysis. By improving the efficiency of blood testing, this research could facilitate a fundamental change to blood analysis and thus could revolutionize patient care.