The BASIS.ed
Senior Projects 2017

The Senior Project at BASIS Phoenix is a selective program that involves an off-campus research project or internship of the students’ choice and design. Students select a BASIS.ed faculty member as their advisor and work with a mentor at their selected research site. These projects may be completed anywhere in the world. At the end of the trimester, students return to campus and present an analysis of their findings to peers, staff, and parents.

BASIS Phoenix is one of 10 BASIS charter schools participating in the 2017 BASIS.ed Senior Project Program. To view the details of a specific project, select a student below.

Alek P.

Solving Automotive Design Challenges with CAD and 3D Printing

See project info

Alek P.

Solving Automotive Design Challenges with CAD and 3D Printing

BASIS advisor: Chip Weber
Internship location: Arizona Science Center
Onsite Mentor: Jonah Michael, Exhibits & Collection Intern
Visit project blog

Wouldn’t it be boring if every car on the road looked the same? Thanks to automotive designers, new vehicle packages are always in development. Many packages, however, are being regurgitated over multiple decades, as the workings of physics and aerodynamics place constraints on design. Fortunately, recent advancements in system components have enabled a whole new world of design choices. I intend to use this project as an opportunity to challenge current design trends and create a valuable contribution to the automotive community. H-Point: The Fundamentals of Car Design and Packaging is my comprehensive guide for the design process. Additionally, I am using online resources to learn how to use computer-aided design software. Once the model is complete, I will use the tools available at the Arizona Science Center’s CREATE facility to build it. There, I have access to various 3D printers, laser cutters, soldering tools, and a woodworking shop. In the automotive industry, form is just as important as function. Artful packaging is essential to any vehicle’s success on the market. Everything in nature (including humans) depends on well-sorted proportions. The same rules govern automobile design. Every year I attend the Barrett Jackson Collector Car Auction. It fascinates me to see the evolution of cars across the decades, as it paints a vivid story of exploration and passion.

Anila T.

Music and the Brain: How Music Affects our Memories

See project info

Anila T.

Music and the Brain: How Music Affects our Memories

BASIS advisor: Kate Taylor
Internship location: Barrow Neurological Institute
Onsite Mentor: Elliot Mufson, PhD, Director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Laboratory at Barrow Neurological Institute
Visit project blog

What are the mechanisms by which Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and dementia deteriorate brain function, and how does music, through music therapy, affect the progression of the disease? At the Barrow Neurological Institute, the Mufson lab attempts to better understand the ways in which AD and other neurodegenerative disorders deteriorate the brain through research using human brain tissue. The Neurological Music Therapy Services of Arizona (NMTSA) seeks to help and treat patients suffering from these diseases using music therapy. By interning at both locations, I can better understand the mechanisms of these neurodegenerative diseases, and how music plays a role in patients’ health and well-being. Music, in regards to neuroscience specifically, is an especially mysterious and unexplored science with the potential to provide information critical to understanding the brain’s functioning. Its undiscovered implications are numerous, involving memory, language, visuospatial ability, and executive functioning. I hope to contribute to a better understanding of this subject through my research at the lab. I will be learning about these diseases through both reading and practical lab work, as well as observing and running tests on brain tissue, in partnership with NMTSA observing the music therapy techniques meant to improve neurological function and clients’ experiences. Overall, I seek to gain more insight into how music and the brain collaborate – how music strengthens and rewires neural connections damaged by disease – that entails promising future discoveries regarding memory, especially when it is lost.

Ariel T.

Business Management Theory in the North American Federation of Temple Youth

See project info

Ariel T.

Business Management Theory in the North American Federation of Temple Youth

BASIS advisor: Mathew McCorkle
Internship location: NFTY (North American Federation of Temple Youth)
Onsite Mentor: Lynne Butner, Senior Regional Director of Youth Engagement, NFTY Southwest Region (SW)
Visit project blog

Too often, youth are ushered into the adult world of business without much knowledge, experience, or preparation. However, for many high schoolers like myself, youth group has been an outlet to develop effective communication and leadership skills that are essential for making one’s way in the world of business. In this project I am studying the North American Federation of Temple Youth, a Jewish youth organization in which I am very active on the regional level. I will be serving as the Programming Vice President of NFTY-Southwest, and on the national level as a member of the Internal Structure Committee, working towards making NFTY function efficiently across all 18 regions. Through my research and documentation of the yearly election processes, the breakdown of leadership responsibilities, and the importance of centralization of powers in the workplace, I will analyze how the experiences and skills acquired through working with NFTY align with the real-world applications of Business Management Theory. These studies take me to Chicago for NFTY Convention, as well as to New York, New Jersey, and many other sites as I serve my term on Southwest regional board, participating in board meetings and advertising and carrying out regional events. My research analyzing NFTY as an organization from the youth perspective will help NFTY function more effectively, as well as inform aspiring students on what to prepare for in their future in business.

Armando C.

How Antibodies can be Used to Treat Dengue-Infected Plants

See project info

Armando C.

How Antibodies can be Used to Treat Dengue-Infected Plants

BASIS advisor: Wendy Sandor
Internship location: Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy, ASU
Onsite Mentor: Qiang Chen, PhD , Professor
Visit project blog

A superbug is any pathogen, a disease-causing agent, that is able to develop resistant against the many antibiotics that doctors can prescribe. Every day there is a growing problem with pathogens such as bacteria and viruses developing resistance to penicillin, cephalexin, and several other antibiotics. This problem will only become more atrocious and will have to be addressed in the future or else there will be a terrible pandemic of superbugs. Throughout my project, I am researching how antibodies can be developed from bioengineered plants and how those antibodies are able to combat viruses such as the dengue virus. It is important to venture out and find new methods that can be used to combat these pathogens before they become superbugs, or else humanity will pay the price. I want to help synthesize antibodies in plants so that I can test to see if these engineered antibodies can prevent the dengue virus from replicating. As long as the virus cannot replicate, there will be less concern over the issue of pathogens adapting to become superbugs. I plan to help researchers develop new antibodies that can be attached to different strains of the dengue virus so that these viruses aren’t able to reproduce. At the end of my project I hope to synthesize successful antibodies so that I can inject those antibodies into mammalian cells in order to provide protection against the dengue virus.

Asfia N.

Laser Scanning the Healing Process

See project info

Asfia N.

Laser Scanning the Healing Process

BASIS advisor: Wendy Sandor
Internship location: Phoenix Children's Hospital
Onsite Mentor: Justin Ryan, PhD, Research Scientist
Visit project blog

Wound healing is an essential part of normal human body functioning. Whenever a person contracts an injury, their skin cells and immune system go straight to work on repair. This occurs in three stages: inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. However, infection and other hindrances may halt this physiological process. Currently, physicians assess how a wound is healing based upon symptoms like discoloration and swelling. My project aims to look for signs of repair malfunction before outer symptoms manifest and recovery becomes more difficult. During my internship at Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s Cardiac 3D Lab, I will be using a laser scanner to look at 3D models of the different stages of wound healing. The subjects will include wound patients at the hospital who consent to be a part of this study. I will compile all my results into a booklet that physicians can utilize to better evaluate how a wound is healing. The aim is to redefine the language of wound healing for superior patient care. Improved wound management will not only reduce incidences of hospital-associated infections, but will also significantly enhance patient quality of life.

Avani V.

The Silent Struggle: Public Knowledge and Perception of Major Depressive Disorder

See project info

Avani V.

The Silent Struggle: Public Knowledge and Perception of Major Depressive Disorder

BASIS advisor: Alissa Sabatino
Internship location: Lighthouse Psychiatry
Onsite Mentor: Chung Trinh, MD, President/CEO
Visit project blog

ccording to the CDC, Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is the leading cause of disability in the US between ages 18-44. Ensuring the proper treatment of MDD through public awareness and education poses major social and financial implications. Furthermore, lack of understanding from the general public about MDD may lead to a stigmatized view of the disease. By surveying a random sample of the general public, I will gain insight into the social perceptions of depression and the level of public knowledge about MDD. To further my individual understanding of MDD throughout the study, I will be interning at Lighthouse Psychiatry under the guidance of Dr. Chung Trinh. I will meet many patients suffering from depression and I will observe their therapy sessions, which will allow exclusive insight into their experiences. I hypothesize that if the public is not receiving necessary information about the biological foundations of MDD and the multiple ways the disorder can be treated, then the public will be less likely to seek treatment for themselves or loved ones, thus feeling stigma towards the diagnosis. Stigma is still a huge issue in the psychological community. By recognizing that part of it may be due to lack of knowledge, we can take steps towards educating the community and destigmatizing this disease.

Elizabeth J.

The Modern Day Female Engineer

See project info

Elizabeth J.

The Modern Day Female Engineer

BASIS advisor: Chip Weber
Internship location: MJS Designs
Onsite Mentor: Stacy Will, Human Resources Manager
Visit project blog

Engineering is traditionally a male-dominated field; however, this attitude is quickly shifting. An increasing number of programs are being implemented to encourage females to pursue the engineering field. Despite these efforts, women still face obstacles when entering engineering. The goal of my project is to display these women and the ways in which society is currently eliminating these obstacles. The project will be research-based, relying heavily on statistics, and will include my first-hand experiences in my internship, providing a better picture of what engineers do. At the conclusion of my project, I hope to break through the traditional stereotypes that society holds towards engineering and display the advantages of having both males and females in engineering fields. In order to gain a better perspective on the issue, I will intern at MJS Designs, a PC circuit board design company. I hope to understand the overall PC production process and work closely with the head electrical engineer. I will use my internship as empirical evidence of what I am finding in my research. I expect to discover a variety of programs geared towards working with females in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and math), and I hope to contribute a younger perspective on this issue.

Giacomo M.

Fair Redistricting: Preventing Partisan and Racial Gerrymandering in the United States

See project info

Giacomo M.

Fair Redistricting: Preventing Partisan and Racial Gerrymandering in the United States

BASIS advisor: Eric Clapeck
Internship location: ACLU of Washington (American Civil Liberties Union of Washington)
Onsite Mentor: Patrick Moore, Volunteer at ACLU-WA Technology and Liberty Project
Visit project blog

The redrawing of districts for US House Representatives and the US Senate can have significant effects on the outcomes of elections. By choosing each voter’s district, state legislators can effectively determine the the relative weight of each voter’s voice, resulting in near-preordained election results. Through a study of the legal and philosophical building blocks of America’s districting system, I will investigate the roots of these problems. Much of this comes from analysis of Supreme Court opinions. I will also discuss other current and proposed systems that individual states implement. This will allow me to determine the criteria by which to measure a districting system’s fairness. A simultaneous analysis of the ongoing legal battles regarding North Carolina’s district maps makes the research applicable to current trends. Americans believe in the principle of one person-one vote. To restore Americans’ confidence in government, it is essential to discuss solutions to the ongoing issue of gerrymandering.

Ivanna C.

The Beauty of Our Desert: Succulents in the Sonoran

See project info

Ivanna C.

The Beauty of Our Desert: Succulents in the Sonoran

BASIS advisor: Brittany Holtzman
Internship location: Desert Botanical Gardens
Onsite Mentor: Nancy White, Volunteer Services Program Director
Visit project blog

The Sonoran Desert is beautiful and inspiring. For those who live in Arizona, the desert is home; it has been mine for more than fifteen years, and the breathtaking landscape never fails to amaze me. But as we continue to expand our industries worldwide, our ecological footprints grow with the consistent demand for land. Over the past decade, the landscape in Scottsdale has morphed from native wilderness to growing suburb, despite sustainability efforts. Plants are the foundation for ecosystems, but they are often overlooked and taken for granted. Worldwide, more than 34,000 known plant species are at risk of extinction. Cacti, which are types of succulent, are globally ranked the fifth most threatened group of living organisms. This project focuses on communicating to the public the great importance of conserving our natural desert landscapes and protecting the indispensable succulents that inhabit them. I am volunteering at the Desert Botanical Garden (DBG), and with the resources available to me as an adult volunteer I am researching Sonoran Desert succulents to further my understanding of the interactions between succulents and the desert environment. I will explore the importance of native succulents, to both the desert and our own lives. I will also create an art piece that conveys this idea, which hopefully will be displayed to the public, illustrating why the desert is beautiful and must be preserved.

Kayla L.

Pediatric Orthopedics: Studying Complications Following Spinal Fusion

See project info

Kayla L.

Pediatric Orthopedics: Studying Complications Following Spinal Fusion

BASIS advisor: Amy Anderson
Internship location: Dr. Richard Shindell's Pediatric Orthopedic Office
Onsite Mentor: Richard Schindell, MD, Dr. Richard Shindell's Pediatric Orthopaedics
Visit project blog

Scoliosis is a spinal disfigurement characterized by a curve in the in spine that is greater than 10º. This disorder affects approximately 3% of the population and is most commonly found in children. There are few causes including chiari malformations and other underlying spinal deformities. Curves above 50º require a surgical treatment referred to as spinal fusion. Although the chances are small, patients undergoing this surgery can have complications following or during the surgery, such as failure of spinal fusion, death, loss of spinal function, neurological damage and many others. By defining a complication as an unexpected consequence of the surgery (thus eliminating “pain” as a so-called complication), I expect to see that most complications reported following the surgery have some sort of relation to a known pre-surgical problem such as other deformities or diseases rather than chance complications. To collect data I will observe patient visits to Dr. Richard Shindell’s pediatric orthopedic office, and do research to find data online to see if complications following spinal fusion relate to pre-operative conditions. Because a large number of pediatric spinal fusions are done each year, it is important to study complications that can follow, and how they possibly can be limited, as well as what precautions doctors already take to ensure a safe and smooth experience for children and family.

Kyle G.

Big Data and Technology in Healthcare Management

See project info

Kyle G.

Big Data and Technology in Healthcare Management

BASIS advisor: Mathew McCorkle
Internship location: Dignity Health Corporate Office
Onsite Mentor: Srinivas Ganti, Lead Solution Architect
Visit project blog

Big Data is an emerging field that allows servers and systems to store and analyze incredibly large amounts of data that would have been impossible before. Big Data can be leveraged in a variety of applications, from identifying broad trends of a large population using astronomical amounts of information, to making complex predictions with computers that would have been impossible by hand. Dignity Health is on the forefront of integrating Big Data into their systems to improve the treatment of patients, and leveraging the internet to provide them with the information to better their hospitals. Social media is a huge focus of one of their ongoing projects; by focusing on Twitter and analyzing the buzz surrounding a topic, they can discover what people are really talking about and how they feel surrounding a certain issue. My role will be to work alongside their teams on multiple projects: a genomics database that will allow integration of genetic information with the clinical data of a patient to provide personalized care, analysis of wholesale drug prices for the hospital against retail prices to ensure patients receive a fair price, and the final Twitter project to run sentiment analysis on the stream of tweets on a issue or topic. These will allow me to truly illustrate the potential of Big Data and how data analytics and technology are being applied to improve healthcare and the daily lives of us all.

Lucy B.

Levels of Fear - Reasoning and Effects

See project info

Lucy B.

Levels of Fear - Reasoning and Effects

BASIS advisor: Rebecca Trillo
Internship location: HonorHealth Scottsdale Thompson Peak Medical Center
Onsite Mentor: Samantha Smith, Volunteer Services Coordinator
Visit project blog

When people hear stories of regular humans lifting cars off themselves or dodging a bullet, they are often dismissed as exaggerations of facts. My goal is to understand how and why such feats are possible by looking into the science of fear. Experiments will be conducted to observe how people of various ages react when encountering stressful environments; to understand multiple reactions, participants will be asked to complete various tasks under pressure. Through various experiments, my goal is to analyze how fear and anxiety affect different people at various levels, and, hopefully, to discover that fear/anxiety is a universal condition given the correct stimulus. This data can be linked to how superhuman feats are not only possible, but can be accomplished by anyone under the right stimulus. Anxiety, fear, and extreme fear have several biological ‘limits’, and with different kinds of stimuli the brain will force the body to react in increasingly ‘superhuman’ ways.

Nicholas T.

Textile Fabrics as Structural Materials for Various Aerospace and Civil Applications

See project info

Nicholas T.

Textile Fabrics as Structural Materials for Various Aerospace and Civil Applications

BASIS advisor: Daniel Deluzio
Internship location: School of Sustainable Engineering and Built Environment, ASU
Onsite Mentor: Barzin Mobasher, PhD, Professor at the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment
Visit project blog

Landing humans on Mars would be cool… right? Well, not without a parachute it wouldn’t be. The Material Science lab at Arizona State University is currently testing parachute materials for a variety of applications. My project will focus specifically on understanding and testing various textile fabric as structural materials for diverse applications in aerospace and civil engineering. For example, kevlar fabric and steel are both considered “strong” in their own right, as the two materials have very different physical and internal properties. Both materials, however, can be tested in ways that apply tensile or compressive forces, introducing varying levels of stress and strain within the material. Material scientists use stress and strain tests to gain a deeper understanding of how and when a material will reach failure. Knowing when an object will fail gives the physical limitations and safe applications in any structure. I will contribute by helping out in the lab in testing and development. This project will allow me to gain lab and team experience, as well as work on NASA-funded research with an end goal of finding a fabric, or a combination of fabrics, that can withstand the stress-levels required to land heavier payloads (like people) on the Red Planet.

Nicholas G.

The Importance of Grit in Today's Education System

See project info

Nicholas G.

The Importance of Grit in Today's Education System

BASIS advisor: Brittany Holtzman
Internship location: Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, ASU
Onsite Mentor: Wendy Barnard, PhD , Research Assistant Professor and Director
Visit project blog

In today’s education system, too many students do not see the value in education or are not motivated to excel. My project seeks to answer a few questions: why are some students not motivated in school? How can we change the way we teach to motivate students? To address both of these questions I will be exploring two closely related concepts– grit and growth-mindset. Grit is defined as passion and perseverance for long-term goals despite setbacks. A student with a growth mindset sees their intelligence as a skill to be honed, not something they born with. In my project I seek to establish a correlation between grit, growth mindset, and academic achievement. Additionally, I will explore how to create a classroom environment that will encourage these traits. This will be done by analyzing pre-existing data from other researchers. To test my theories, I will go into middle schools and give students a test to determine if they have a growth or fixed mindset (students who believe that their intelligence is unchangeable). I will work with the students who have a fixed mindset to help them develop both grit and a growth mindset by giving them a series of exercises and lesson plans. I will track their progress through qualitative and quantitative data to see if my lessons are effective. By instilling these values in children early in their academic careers, we are fostering future leaders.

Nina C.

The Refugee Crisis: Stranded in Serbia

See project info

Nina C.

The Refugee Crisis: Stranded in Serbia

BASIS advisor: Darin Namminga
Internship location: Ministry of Defense - Material Resources Sector, Republic of Serbia
Onsite Mentor: Tomislav Djordjevic, Lieutenant Colonel
Visit project blog

Immigration is a hotbed issue in every country in the world. However, the crisis that most nations are currently facing is not that of hopeful immigrants, but rather desperate refugees who are fleeing their homelands in fear of persecution. The Serbian government, specifically the Ministry of Defense, and various independent organizations, are working to aid the refugees who have become unable to continue their journey past Serbia due to neighboring countries’ rejection and violence at border crossings. By interviewing independent agents and government officials while interning at the Ministry, and by conducting on-site visits, I will witness first-hand how these efforts to minimize hardship are manifesting and evaluate their effectiveness. As I delve deeper into the international sphere of governmental relations, I hope to learn more about the realities of bureaucratic dealings that pertain to the humanitarian crisis at hand.

Sayish K.

Making a Wind Tunnel

See project info

Sayish K.

Making a Wind Tunnel

BASIS advisor: Daniel Deluzio
Internship location: Arizona Challenger Space Center
Onsite Mentor: Jon Van de Water, Education Director
Visit project blog

A wind tunnel is a tool used in aerodynamic research to study the effects of air moving past solid objects; it consists of a tubular passage with an object of interest mounted in the middle. Air is made to move past the object by a powerful fan system to simulate the effect of the object traveling at fast speeds. The purpose of my project at the Arizona Challenger Space Center is to build a wind tunnel to help teach visiting students about aircraft stability and wing structures of planes. This model will be used as a template for a permanent display at the Space Center. My hope is that the permanent display of the wind tunnel will help those visiting to understand what a wind tunnel is, why it is important, and how it is used to test the stability of any aerodynamic structure. Given that there are many ways to construct a wind tunnel, I will research the different types of wind tunnels in order to find the advantages as well as disadvantages of each type. I will focus mainly on the engineering of wind tunnels, as a way to understand the nuances behind creating such a structure. I hope to simplify the process of creating a wind tunnel drastically in order to allow people to easily understand what wind tunnels are and how they are used.

Shambhavi M.

Autism Spectrum Disorders from a Parent and Patient Perspective

See project info

Shambhavi M.

Autism Spectrum Disorders from a Parent and Patient Perspective

BASIS advisor: Alissa Sabatino
Internship location: SARCC (Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center)
Onsite Mentor: Carlos Nuno, Programs Coordinator
Visit project blog

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurological and developmental disability that can cause social and behavioral challenges. The number of children diagnosed with ASD has grown tremendously over the past decade. What has contributed to this staggering increase in ASD diagnosis? Many believe that an increase in public knowledge about ASD has caused a higher diagnosis rate, yet many people still do not receive the resources necessary for managing ASD throughout their lives. The goal of my project is to better understand the experiences of parents with children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. My research will test the hypothesis that if people do not understand the diagnosis criteria for ASD, they will be less likely to seek professional intervention when needed. To test this hypothesis, I am interviewing families of kids with an Autism diagnosis (between the ages of 0-18) through a survey which asks about the experience of receiving an ASD diagnosis. Studying ASD and the public understanding of the disorder remains pertinent for educating families, physicians and the public about identifying and managing the disorder.

Shreya P.

Sliced and Sutured

See project info

Shreya P.

Sliced and Sutured

BASIS advisor: Amy Anderson
Internship location: Banner Thunderbird Medical Center
Onsite Mentor: Sundeep Patel, MD, Cardiothoracic Surgeon
Visit project blog

Cardiac surgeries are high-risk procedures, and can come with numerous postoperative complications. Delayed sternal closure (DSC), essentially leaving the chest open for some time after cardiac surgery, may be necessary if compression due to sternal closure cannot be tolerated, or if the patient is experiencing hemodynamic instability (compromised blood flow). However, using the wrong type of suture in this case introduces risks such as sepsis, bleeding, and an array of additional problems. This project investigates three cardiac sutures as potential causes of infection in DSC patients. Observing cardiothoracic surgeries that DSC patients undergo can aid in understanding how surgeons choose a specific suture in a given circumstance. In addition, this project addresses the infection rates of Monofilament Polypropylene, Monofilament Nylon, and Braided Polyester sutures, common sutures used in cardiothoracic surgeries. By conducting this research, potential improvements for sutures may be introduced by highlighting important features of each in preventing bacterial growth.

Shubhangi A.

Counting Sheep: The Many Ways Sleep Disorders Lead to Cognitive Impairment

See project info

Shubhangi A.

Counting Sheep: The Many Ways Sleep Disorders Lead to Cognitive Impairment

BASIS advisor: Brittany Holtzman
Internship location: Phoenix Neurological and Pain Institute
Onsite Mentor: Tammie Vela, Office Manager
Visit project blog

Do you know how many neurological diseases go undiagnosed? Or are diagnosed incorrectly? Did you know that many symptoms of one neurological disorder are confused with those of another? There are many things we know about the brain, but there are also many things we have yet to learn. Its complexity creates problems in testing for disorders. Most neurological diseases do not have laboratory tests that give “yes” or “no” answers, resulting in multiple diagnoses. This is an issue when diagnosing disorders. The same is true for sleep disorders. Sleep helps the body heal and repair its blood vessels. A prolonged sleep deficiency or a sleep disorder can result in damage to various organs of the body apart from the brain. For instance, a decreased amount of oxygen in the body during sleep can result in changes to the heart as well as structural problems in the brain. Through working with a neurologist at Phoenix Neurological and Pain Institute, I hope to gain insight into various sleep disorders and the distinct ways they affect the structure of the brain and in turn, different cognitive functions. Sleep disorders, especially sleep apnea, are relatively common. My goal is to add to what we know about them through this research.

Sydney M.

Establishing Optimal Bonding Protocol for Zirconia Dental Restorations

See project info

Sydney M.

Establishing Optimal Bonding Protocol for Zirconia Dental Restorations

BASIS advisor: Patrick Caniglia
Internship location: College of Dental Medicine, Midwestern University
Onsite Mentor: Robert Kramer, DMD, Assistant Professor / Preclinical Leader
Visit project blog

All-ceramic dental materials, such as zirconia (Zr) and lithium disilicate (LD), have become increasingly popular compared to the standard porcelain fused to metal (PFM) and complete cast metal materials, due to their strength and likeness to natural human teeth. With this recent shift in preference, there are currently several methods practiced to adhere a crown to a tooth. My project, in conjunction with the College of Dental Medicine at Midwestern University, is a systematic review of the literature to determine the optimal bonding protocol for indirect zirconia restoration to natural teeth. An exhaustive search will be performed utilizing various search engines to find current literature using the following designations: cementing procedure, zirconia crowns, and bonding protocol. The texts will be examined and sorted based on zirconia type, intaglio surface preparation, intaglio surface primer, cement type, methods of tooth surface preparation (total etch, selective etch, or self etch) and adhesive strengths between tooth and restoration.

Victoria L.

The Design Process: Architectural Implications

See project info

Victoria L.

The Design Process: Architectural Implications

BASIS advisor: Stephanie Rieser
Internship location: LEA Architects
Onsite Mentor: Beverly Enyart, Operations Manager
Visit project blog

A constant presence in our urban lives: architecture. But is all that meets the eye, all that it is? Let the investigation begin! Taking an administrative role at an architecture firm, I aim to observe and experience all of the overlooked details and processes taken in order for our structures to come to life. Why is architecture so important? And in what ways are we, as a society and an environment, affected by it? Through the first-hand opportunity of witnessing the architectural process at work, as well as independent study from readings and films, I will be very well-balanced in the sense that many perspectives and aspects will be addressed in my research. As architecture may influence and affect our surroundings, architects must be very considerate whilst designing the structure. Seemingly miniscule decisions may upset the structure in the grand scale. This concept of architecture is an onion, waiting to be peeled.